Home>Discussions>TOOLS & PRODUCTS>Painting to cover knots in wood
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Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Painting to cover knots in wood

You know, they're now selling water-based shellac. No alky. I mean, it's an OUTRAGE! What next?

For the odd knot, the white pigmented shellac comes in a handy spray/rattle can. Also good for a small water stain on the ceiling; no need to get out a roller. But lay a cover; those rattle cans spit!
Casey

Fencepost
Re: Painting to cover knots in wood
jkirk wrote:

you read way too into this stuff nestor, very few proffesional contractors would go the extents that you do to find out the amount of pointless info you are going for other than what works or doesn't. let it rest.

True, most people are just looking for a recommendation of a product that meets their needs, whether it's a "perfect" product or not.

Nevertheless, having an understanding of the chemistry behind it all will help the craftsman select the most appropriate product for the application. When the most appropriate product isn't available, knowing the chemistry will help you choose an acceptable substitute.

dj1
Re: Painting to cover knots in wood

I'm staying out of this chemistry class.

I don't see the point of bringing chemistry in, to answer a simple question.

naxtor2000
Re: Painting to cover knots in wood

personally i found it interesting, but I'm that kinda gal.

Housedoc
Re: Painting to cover knots in wood

Me too, I like it!:D

Erik
Re: Painting to cover knots in wood

How do you treat exterior wood structure with bleeding pine knots, such as a canopy or cornice?

 

ordjen
Re: Painting to cover knots in wood

Some things never change, after all these years Nestor is still giving lengthy, professorial answers, when the poor homeowner only wants to know what to use!

Zinsser's BIN is the white pigmented shellac. They also make "clear" shellac and SealCoat, which is the de-waxed shellac. Any of them will work. However, Zinsser recommends that they be only used directly over the knots. Shellac is just about vapor impermeable. Sealing large areas of an external wall with shellac just about guarantees that the wall will peel, as the wall then cannot "breathe".

To lesson the chance of those "shiners" that Spruce refers to, hit the spot primed areas  with the finish coat paint first and let dry before applying the general coat.

By the way A Spruce, glad to see you and the other "old timers" are still around. I have been absent since the TOH Discussions board went through its changes a couple years back. I'm still working at that orange "big box" store you so dislike.  :)  What else is a widowed, 75 year old fellow supposed to do! I have stayed active on the big box public "How To" blog, and its internal blog, where I try to keep my fellow paint associates informed. I think the mucky mucks at the home office in Atlanta think that I am a pain in the rear. Good!

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