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Smudge
Painting exterior metal

I am looking for recommendations on exterior metal paint for stairs, railings, fence and gates. I was told Benjamin Moore Alkyd was the best but afraid the high gloss would make the steps slippery and it's an expensive paint. Rustoleum protective Enamel is much cheaper and is available in flat finish. Do I paint the steps in flat finish and railings, gate and fence in high gloss? Please, any advice. I want the paint to last.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Painting exterior metal

The higher the gloss the tighter the finish the longer the paint job lasts. That is why house exteriors are normally painted high gloss, which looks flat after a few weeks in the weather.

My 2 decade long preference is for Hammerite (which is sold by Rustoleuom Brand in the USA) for all exterior metal.

Used some today.

Smudge
Re: Painting exterior metal

Thank you for the information. I read there is no need to prime with hammerite paint. Do you agree? I want to brush the paint, as opposed to spray, and I want a satin or glossy finish. Is this paint readily available at the big box stores? Is rustoleum brand the only hammerite paint you recommend? I also read it's hard to paint with this product. I'm up for the challenge, but if you have any tips, please pass them along.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Painting exterior metal

According to the manufacturer, you don't need shiny metal. Some rust is OK as long as it isn't loose, flakey or powdery as paint doesn't stick to loose, powdery surfaces.

Home Depot carries Rustoleum Hammered paint in my area.

Its not hard to paint at all. The one trick which takes a little practice- apply the right amount to get the hammered look; too little and it looks brushed. Too much and it runs. The middle ground is easy to hit.

Use a good paint brush that costs more than $19

ed21
Re: Painting exterior metal
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

Use a good paint brush that costs more than $19

Do you mean $.19? :)

Mastercarpentry
Re: Painting exterior metal

Most exterior metal paint failures occur under the paint not through wear or fading,, and most name brand alkyd enamel paints will last about the same length of time, color fading aside. That's where the better paints work better. Prep well leaving no red rust; light brown rust is actually the same oxide that metal primers have in them and once covered they will not deteriorate any further. Use a compatible primer if you want to, but with a good prepping I find this not very necessary most of the time. Rustoleum is one of my fave paints- I always get what I expect from it. I've always sprayed hammerite finishes but most folks prefer solid colors which are easier to brush apply. Stair treads will take a beating with wear, normally I'll repaint treads 2-3 times for each full repaint.

Phil

Smudge
Re: Painting exterior metal

When would priming be necessary? I'm trying to avoid this step if possible. I'll make sure the rust is brown and I will use a rust reformer which acts as a primer on the badly rusted areas and a few small spots. And I'll make sure I sand smooth. Do you think I can skip this priming step?

dj1
Re: Painting exterior metal

I hate to tell you, but if you skip the primer, you will be painting again real soon.

Smudge
Re: Painting exterior metal

I thought that would be the answer. Is one coat of primer sufficient? There is a rusty metel primer and a clean and lightly rusted primer. Parts of my project are so rusted the metel is breaking off, like the bottom of a gate. But for the most part, not rusted and smooth. As I said before, I am going to reform the rusty parts which also acts as a primer. My question is what is the difference between rusty and clean and lightly rusted primers, and which should I use?

Thank you again.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Painting exterior metal

You'll need a metal primer with every metal paint except the hammered paint.

Smudge
Re: Painting exterior metal

Now that I cleaned the metal stairs, I realize there is some separation between the stair risers and treads. The splits had been closed using some sort of rubbery material, maybe caulk. I would like to clean out this material, as it is loose. Any advice on the best product to reseal these opening would be greatly appreciated. Although it may sound like it, the stairs are not at all rickety. Thank you.

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