Home>Discussions>PAINTING & FINISHING>paint peeling where sheetrock meets wood beam
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Dawson
paint peeling where sheetrock meets wood beam

I have a problem with a renovation on an old tower. The tower has lovely old wooden post and beam construction. I have installed purple sheetrock which is cut to butt up to the beams and used fast set sheetrock compound on the edge next to the beams to fill the gap. Once everything was very dry, I painted the sheetrock with a mold resistant primer followed by a high quality cover paint. Now the paint is peeling off in sheets, typically starting where the sheetrock meets the exposed wood beams. Specifically the overcoat and primer are peeling off in one sheet with the primer side showing the surface of the purple board paper. 

Has anyone seen anything like this? Is it an issue of the primer, cover paint, or joint between wood and sheetrock? As I will have to strip off the existing paint down to the sheetrock, is there a better way to paint these walls?

Clarence
Re: paint peeling where sheetrock meets wood beam

 I think you have a moisture problem and all the moisture is excaping at the edge of the drywall. The same thing happens with wall paper the seams & edges always peel do to moisture.

Dawson
Re: paint peeling where sheetrock meets wood beam

Thanks for the input. Here is some more information on the situation. The tower wall is old shiplap redwood siding nailed to the beams and old full size studs. I lined the inside surface with Tyvek house wrap to limit moisture from outside and nailed the new purple sheetrock over the Tyvek. What is curious is that after I primed the sheetrock, it was several days in summer before I applied the overcoat. Within an hour or so of the overcoat application, I began to notice the entire primer/overcoat layer peeling. There was no rain in the interim. I live in the San Francisco Bay area. Hard to see how moisture is coming into this unless the wall is drawing it directly from the primer. The strange thing is that you can see the peeled material has taken with it both the top paper surface of the purple sheet rock and the compound. Seems like adhesion isn't the problem. 

My goal at this point is to find out how others have painted sheetrock butting up to old wood. Seems to be a technique problem.

Clarence
Re: paint peeling where sheetrock meets wood beam

 I still think it is a moisture problem.

Paper seperating from the Gypsum core is caused by moisture.

Get a moisture meter and take some readings. Drywall moisture content i think is aroung 6% wood can be 19% Also check on the tyvex being installed on the interior maybe trapping moisture behind the drywall. Is the interior air condishioned ?

Dawson
Re: paint peeling where sheetrock meets wood beam

I appreciate the input. This is an old water tower. No air conditioning. I will see about the moisture meter to see if it is high. The recommendation by some folks is to use a PVA primer instead of other types. I am trying it. However the current primer seems to attach to the paper of the sheetrock just fine. I am wondering if there is some sort of chemical reaction going which is weakening to paper itself. My real question here is how other folks handle painting sheetrock adjacent to exposed wood beams? In my case the sheetrock butts up to the wood and the gap filled with fastset compound.

Clarence
Re: paint peeling where sheetrock meets wood beam

 Well lets look at it like this there are three things that affect Gypsum & they are Water , Fire & Man. You sat that the Gypsum board goes up to the wood beam than the joint ( space ) is filled with fast set compound which is a Gypsum product. Now if the normal moisture content of Gypsum is 6% and Wood is 19% moisture will be drawn from the wood to the Gypsum product. On the installation the Gypsum board should have had a J bead or L bead installed at the junction at the beam.

Did you check on the moisture barrier being installed behind the Gypsum board

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