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Sten
Paint Lines

I'm painting my Daughters Bureau black from tan wood grained.

1. Primer is Zinsser water based.
2. Paint is Old Village Acrylic Latex (satin finis
3. Palm sanded all areas to be painted
4. Using Foam Brush.

I thought that with a foam brush I would eliminate the lines made from the brush stroke. There not as bad but still there, would anyone have an idea as how to get rid of them or, am I doing something wrong??

bp21901
Re: Paint Lines

Maybe try floetrol to help the paint spread evenly.

Sten
Re: Paint Lines

Thanks, I'll give it a shot

A. Spruce
Re: Paint Lines

There is no way to get a smooth as glass finish with anything other than sprayed finishes. The satin finish you're using should help hide some of the stroke marks, but you will always see them.

Keep in mind that low ambient light intensity and angle, clutter on and around the piece will help to mute any brush stroke effects.

bp21901
Re: Paint Lines

Good point by spruce....if your daughter is anything like mine, you will never see the top of the bureau again! :)

canuk
Re: Paint Lines

You may have better luck with oil paint -- it generally lays better than latex.
Also it will dry harder and wouldn't end up having a sticky finish.

ordjen
Re: Paint Lines

I would concur with both Spruce and Canuk: A spray finish will be superior to a brushed on finish. Oil or lacquer is a superior finish to latex/acrylic for furniture for the reasons stated by Canuk.

An oil or lacquer finished which is brushed on with a good ox-hair bristle brush can also give an excellent finish. Most do-it-yourselfers will not likely buy an ox-hair, because they are too expensive and most paint stores don't even stock them. I usually had to special order them and had to buy a half dozen at a time.
Purdy makes an excellent line of ox-hairs. When doing large ,flat areas, a foam roller used in conjunction with the brush, aids in getting a smooth, lint free surface.

Sten
Re: Paint Lines

Thanks for the excellent info unfortunately I used the paint I put in the OP and as Canuk stated it's sticky or tacky. Can I go over this paint with an oil base paint or would I have to strip it first

ordjen
Re: Paint Lines

Sten,

You can put an oil based paint or varnish over the latex. This should help in lessening the tackiness that is prevalent in every acrylic based paint that I know of. Oil based varnishes have a slight amber tone which might affect the color of the underlying paint. I would give the latex a few days to reasonably cure before top coating it.

Stripping would give you a clean slate, but it is a lot of work and some expence. I would try the oil based top coat first. You don't have much to lose by trying this first.

Sten
Re: Paint Lines
ordjen wrote:

Sten,

You can put an oil based paint or varnish over the latex. This should help in lessening the tackiness that is prevalent in every acrylic based paint that I know of. Oil based varnishes have a slight amber tone which might affect the color of the underlying paint. I would give the latex a few days to reasonably cure before top coating it.

Stripping would give you a clean slate, but it is a lot of work and some expence. I would try the oil based top coat first. You don't have much to lose by trying this first.

I believe that's what I'm going to do, my daughter doesn't mind the tackiness but it's just not right and could be better. would one of those Ox Hair brushes be in order?

ordjen
Re: Paint Lines

Sten,

The oxhair brush will give a superior brushed finish. However, as I stated, they are expensive. A 2 or 2 1/2 inch Purdy will be in the range of $20 to $25. For sure, you won't find them in the "big box" stores. A Pro oriented paint store might have them in stock.

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