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Fencepost
Re: outlets and junction box

We saw that last time you posted it, BRP.

Canuk, in your latest drawing, if you go down 5 feet from the corner you'll still be 7 feet from the nearest outlet. I'm no inspector, neither do I know one, and it's been 15 years since I cracked a code book, but I suspect an American inspector would make you add an outlet or a door on that wall somewhere between the corner and 4 feet down.

Maybe it's allowed in Canada?

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: outlets and junction box
Fencepost wrote:

We saw that last time you posted it, BRP.

Canuk, in your latest drawing, if you go down 5 feet from the corner you'll still be 7 feet from the nearest outlet. I'm no inspector, neither do I know one, and it's been 15 years since I cracked a code book, but I suspect an American inspector would make you add an outlet or a door on that wall somewhere between the corner and 4 feet down.

Maybe it's allowed in Canada?

Since obviously Canuk and JKirk both missed the orignal poster indicated LOCATION as Wisconsin, which last time I checked was still in the United States so their arguing the Canadian Codes which of course wouldn't be applicable so why either are jumping on this topic string is somewhat questionable in the first place....

AND

Apparently canuk didn't see it or simply missed what it (the Code) actually says, which is why I highlighted the applicable portions he was obviously overlooking, which answered his question; since he twice presented a drawing with an unbroken wall with a corner which was 14" long measured horizontally along the floor line, according to his drawing. If this drawing is supposed to be indoors in one of the areas highlighted in my post in a dwelling unit.

Now if this was in a hallway, foyer, unfinished basement used for storage, a closet, garage, etc. it would be allowed (hallways & foyers are not measured along the wall but in the center line, occupiable or habital space is the issue), if it were other than a dwelling unit it would be allowed, if this is a bathroom it might be allowed. If there are fixed items not in the diagram it may or may not be allowed by the unammended NEC, local ammendments may alter.

By the way what's on the bottom corner of that 12' wall? 4+ inches of drywall for the return? Another wall surface? a corner? a window? we don't know, and that horizontal line wraps around where ever....unless it is a break but you measure to that break point we don't know. Also one receptacle must be WITHIN for the rule you don't measure to the edge, and you only need ONE not TWO, so the entire average duplex does not have to be within, but ONE of them must be within, not just the edge, not the middle point of one, one completely within the limitations, and that is also where you start the measurement from. That's were most folks get into trouble - they'll be off having exceeded by 2 or more inches or forget that a floating wall has a side they failed to include in their measurement. Its also usually pretty darn tough to have an outlet at the END of a wall especially a floating one, there's usually structural considerations (masonry or stud) that make that rather difficult - so you end up having them moved in a bit.

However as I first read the original post it appeared more as a fill question for a junction box or a question regarding the extension(s) of circuit(s) from a junction box to extend the electrical system to a newly constructed wall.

canuk
Re: outlets and junction box
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

Since obviously Canuk and JKirk both missed the orignal poster indicated LOCATION as Wisconsin, which last time I checked was still in the United States so their arguing the Canadian Codes which of course wouldn't be applicable so why either are jumping on this topic string is somewhat questionable in the first place....

AND

Apparently canuk didn't see it or simply missed what it (the Code) actually says, which is why I highlighted the applicable portions he was obviously overlooking, which answered his question; since he twice presented a drawing with an unbroken wall with a corner which was 14" long measured horizontally along the floor line, according to his drawing. If this drawing is supposed to be indoors in one of the areas highlighted in my post in a dwelling unit.

Now if this was in a hallway, foyer, unfinished basement used for storage, a closet, garage, etc. it would be allowed (hallways & foyers are not measured along the wall but in the center line, occupiable or habital space is the issue), if it were other than a dwelling unit it would be allowed, if this is a bathroom it might be allowed. If there are fixed items not in the diagram it may or may not be allowed by the unammended NEC, local ammendments may alter.

By the way what's on the bottom corner of that 12' wall? 4+ inches of drywall for the return? Another wall surface? a corner? a window? we don't know, and that horizontal line wraps around where ever....unless it is a break but you measure to that break point we don't know. Also one receptacle must be WITHIN for the rule you don't measure to the edge, and you only need ONE not TWO, so the entire average duplex does not have to be within, but ONE of them must be within, not just the edge, not the middle point of one, one completely within the limitations, and that is also where you start the measurement from. That's were most folks get into trouble - they'll be off having exceeded by 2 or more inches or forget that a floating wall has a side they failed to include in their measurement. Its also usually pretty darn tough to have an outlet at the END of a wall especially a floating one, there's usually structural considerations (masonry or stud) that make that rather difficult - so you end up having them moved in a bit.

However as I first read the original post it appeared more as a fill question for a junction box or a question regarding the extension(s) of circuit(s) from a junction box to extend the electrical system to a newly constructed wall.

As always it's a pleasure to come upon one of your warm , pleasant and comforting posts.

The last time I checked and as you have posted yourself ..... this is an open public forum .... which shouldn't be questionable for anyone participating ( except for you and your miserable attitude ).

No ....... I didn't miss where the OP is from also the fact of your reciting the NEC ( who could ) and I'm not arguing your NEC requirements .... simply pointing out there was a difference between the NEC and the CEC as to the number of devices allowed on a general circuit.

I was simply asking a question with the illustration submitted.

Fencepost
Re: outlets and junction box

I think we left the OP in the dust a long time ago.

ed21
Re: outlets and junction box

And to all a good night.:rolleyes:

canuk
Re: outlets and junction box
Fencepost wrote:

I think we left the OP in the dust a long time ago.

ed21 wrote:

And to all a good night.:rolleyes:

Yep ... you're right enough is enough

Gray Watson
Re: outlets and junction box

Welcome scottgolf.

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