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JLMCDANIEL
Re: outlets and junction box
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

More horse's ptooties heard from.
Don't believe any of your inspector stories. Code inspectors have to cite code references in their citations. unless you can prove there was some wacky local ammendment don't believe your stories.

A very telling statement, it's quite obvious you have never dealt with building inspectors on a professional level.
Jack

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: outlets and junction box

That's you MSU again.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: outlets and junction box
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

That's you MSU again.

No, just an observation.
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: outlets and junction box
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

A very telling statement, it's quite obvious you have never dealt with building inspectors on a professional level.
Jack

No kidding.:rolleyes:

goldhiller
Re: outlets and junction box

Knowledge without experience is just information.... Mark Twain

Ernie_Fergler
Re: outlets and junction box
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Well, I can certainly understand why the OP hasn't returned. He asked a question about outlets, a commonly used term to refer to the receptacle, cover plate, mounting box, mounting hard ware, and associated wiring. It may not be a scientific, engineering, code, or nit picking individual part name but is prevalent in everyday language used by home owners and trades people alike just like saying they want a switch installed and meaning the switch, the box wiring etc.

The NEC requirement is based on the assumption that electrical appliances will have standard 6 foot cords and no mater where you place it on the wall the cord should reach an outlet without and extension cord. That allows receptacles to be 12' apart. However, as I said before it doesn't matter what the NEC says, what matters is the interpretation and requirements of the locale jurisdictions and their inspectors. Most I have dealt with require the outlets to be no more than 6' apart and one even required them every 4'.
Jack

Once again we agree.:D
I also never read posts from Google pro's.:D

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: outlets and junction box
jkirk wrote:

im currently renovating the house i just purchased, it was pretty hideous inside when the place closed

1960's shag carpet
1970's panelling
1980's wallpaper
1970's light fixtures
2 flat roofs that have 3 layers of shingles

anyhow, the house is owned by my brother and myself, both of us have basement apartments currently which were living in while doing the reno, our folks live quite close to the place and are helping out quite a bit,

i removed all the carpet, wallpaper, tore out 3 walls, tore out both bedroom closets, all the panelling, 70% of the trim, the rear mudroom has a leaking roof and major water damage so i tore that right out. After 3 days of demo, the 6x8 shed was full the 10 x 14 deck was completely covered with contractor garbage bags and a section of the yard was filling up with carpet.

i work in the renovation sector and am a certified carpenter so i know the costs of debris disposal, locally it costs $115/ ton for a mixed load, before tax!!. i didnt budget for paying to dispose of it. so its going to the curb.

the city regulates the amount of garbage allowed at the curb so 7 bags were at the curb of the house, 6 were scattered up the street, carpet was dragged to the curb of our apartments, and our father has been hawling loads of garbage in his car to various friends houses whos garbage pick up days are different. in a 3 day period of garbage removal were down more than 1/2 of our garbage.

the only other downside is the electricians and plumbers are taking the copper they remove with them.. it would be nice to get money back for amount copper is going for nowadays

jkirk wrote:

blue ridge, no matter where someone is from it does not change how many outlets a circuit can handle

you obviously dont have a clue what your talking about. from your response. any given circuit can handle any amount of items plugged in. have you ever tried running 2 circular saws and a 500 watt halogen lamp off a 15 amp breaker. tell me what happens, i highly doubt you can say. theres a reason theres a circuit dedicated just to a kitchen not including the stove or fridge, because they draw too much power.

go back to sleep blueridge

You jump in with "if I remember correctly" after two of us already stated what the code was and I even QUOTED IT. You didn't "remember" anything about the National Electrical Code canadian.

YOU obviously have no idea what you are talking about! Overloading a circuit has nothing to do anything hinted at by the OPs question, and has nothing to do with the number of receptacles or other outlets allowed on a general branch circuit for a dwelling. Your trying to stretch into the small appliance circuit territory, dedicated circuits and lighting circuits in a Kitchen in the US in an area governed by adoption of the NEC is equally lame, ignorant and flawed. Circuit overload protection has nothing to do with the number or frequency of the placement of outlets and nothing to do with the fill capacity allowed for junction boxes.

Stick to fly dumping and sharing your parent's basement "apartment" with your brother.

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: outlets and junction box

Boring and you still don't have a clue Jkirk.

The OP won't be back.

Sadly you will continue to stalk, harass, and spout excrement. Do us all a favor: close the door first, aim, flush, and be sure you wash your hands before you rejoin the room. Company doesn't need to see it, despite what Mommy told you when you were little, it isn't a work of art, music to our ears, nor worthy of a prize, and we're all tired of smelling it.:rolleyes:

djohns
Re: outlets and junction box
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

Boring and you still don't have a clue Jkirk.

The OP won't be back.

Sadly you will continue to stalk, harass, and spout excrement. Do us all a favor: close the door first, aim, flush, and be sure you wash your hands before you rejoin the room. Company doesn't need to see it, despite what Mommy told you when you were little, it isn't a work of art, music to our ears, nor worthy of a prize, and we're all tired of smelling it.:rolleyes:

Now there's one worthy of reporting . :cool:

bsum1
Re: outlets and junction box
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

The Original poster asked a vague question about outlets off a junction box for a newly constructed wall. Lets reserve assumptive discussions about receptacle placement (not the same thing! an outlet is not necessarily a receptacle), etc.unless and until the OP indicates THAT is what he is asking about and the characteristics of this newly constructed wall (kitchen, bathroom, free-standing garage, mobile home, commercial office, etc.)..

Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

Unless its a local rule/ammendment that's just bogus. Name the jurisdiction, inspector and citation. Your not being able to fathom the general Code rule for regular dwelling units, I'll reserve comment. I'll also reserve comment on your personal attacks as well as your "belief" system(s). However, regarding the NEC you are not interpreting nor applying the the minimum rule correctly.

Receptacles 12' apart allow for no point on the wall being greater than 6' from a receptacle: that's the NEC rule. Wisconsin uses the NEC. Portable Lamps (UL 153) have cords, if your cord is too short get an extension or replace the cord with a longer one. If you want a 3rd lamp closer to your lamp 1 location than you can accomodate by pluging it into receptacle 2 location, plug it into the same outlet location as your lamp 1, duplex receptacles are the norm. Your decorating concerns aside, the code is a minimum rule. It is not a design nor a decorating guide.

2008 NEC:

210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets. This section
provides requirements for 125-volt, 15- and 20-ampere re-
ceptacle outlets. The receptacles required by this section
shall be in addition to any receptacle that is:

  • (1) Part of a luminaire or appliance, or
  • (2) Controlled by a wall switch in accordance with 210.70(A)(1), Exception No. 1, or
  • (3) Located within cabinets or cupboards, or
  • (4) Located more than 1.7 in (5-1/2 ft) above the floor

Permanently installed electric baseboard heaters equipped
with factory-installed receptacle outlets or outlets provided as
a separate assembly by the manufacturer shall be permitted as
the required outlet or outlets for the wall space utilized by
such permanently installed heaters. Such receptacle outlets
shall not be connected to the heater circuits.
FPN: Listed baseboard heaters include instructions that may not permit their installation below receptacle outlets.
(A) General Provisions. In every kitchen, family room,
dining room, living room, parlor, library, den, sunroom,
bedroom, recreation room, or similar room or area of
dwelling units, receptacle outlets shall be installed in accor-
dance with the general provisions specified in 210.52(A)(1)
through (A)(3).

(1) Spacing. Receptacles shall be installed such that no
point measured horizontally along the floor line in any wall
space is more than 1.8 m (6 ft) from a receptacle outlet. (That's 12 ft apart!!!)

(2) Wall Space. As used in this section, a wall space shall

include the following:

  • (1) Any space 600 mm (2 ft) or more in width (including space measured around corners) and unbroken along the floor line by doorways, fireplaces, and similar openings.
  • (2) The space occupied by fixed panels in exterior walls, excluding sliding panels
  • (3) The space afforded by fixed room dividers such as free-standing bar-type counters or railings

(3) Floor Receptacles. Receptacle outlets in floors shall
not be counted as part of the required number of receptacle
outlets unless located within 450 mm (18 in.) of the wall.

More horse's ptooties heard from.

You haven't actually convinced yourself(selves) that your

own wild imaginations, fraudulent creations and inventions are

actualy TRUE have you???

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