68 posts / 0 new
Last post
Blue RidgeParkway
Re: outlets and junction box
scottgolf wrote:

I am wiring a new interior wall, how many outlets am I allowed off a junction box?

The Original poster asked a vague question about outlets off a junction box for a newly constructed wall. Lets reserve assumptive discussions about receptacle placement (not the same thing! an outlet is not necessarily a receptacle), etc.unless and until the OP indicates THAT is what he is asking about and the characteristics of this newly constructed wall (kitchen, bathroom, free-standing garage, mobile home, commercial office, etc.)..

A. Spruce
Re: outlets and junction box

You are quite funny Blue. Finally, that sense of humor is coming out.:D

Ernie_Fergler
Re: outlets and junction box
A. Spruce wrote:

I believe that the common interpretation by most inspectors is "6 feet between" outlets, that is, hold a tape measure on one outlet and reel it out to any 6' diameter where it intersects a wall. Case in point, on one particular project that I was involved, we had two sliding glass doors that were side by side in a wall. We had to install a floor plug between the doors because the wall exceeded the maximum spacing allotment. Additional info to this particular project, there was an outlet immediately to the side of each sliding glass door, so the distance in question was only the width of the two doors combined.

I'm on board with you on that one.

A. Spruce
Re: outlets and junction box
Ernie_Fergler wrote:

I'm on board with you on that one.

You know how it is, Ernie, some things you just can't learn from Google.

Ernie_Fergler
Re: outlets and junction box
A. Spruce wrote:

You know how it is, Ernie, some things you just can't learn from Google.

I can't fathom spacing outlets 12' apart. Nor would local inspectors allow it.
Say you place table lamp 1 at an outlet. Table lamp 2 will be placed 12' away. Even if you would drag those two lamps together they are six feet away from each other. Not to mention placing a Wave radio or small TV in between the two lamps. How would that fit into all that and still be energized?.

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: outlets and junction box
Ernie_Fergler wrote:

Sorry, but I have to disagree with your 6' rule that allows outlets to be 12' apart.

A. Spruce wrote:

I believe that the common interpretation by most inspectors is "6 feet between" outlets, that is, hold a tape measure on one outlet and reel it out to any 6' diameter where it intersects a wall. Case in point, on one particular project that I was involved, we had two sliding glass doors that were side by side in a wall. We had to install a floor plug between the doors because the wall exceeded the maximum spacing allotment. Additional info to this particular project, there was an outlet immediately to the side of each sliding glass door, so the distance in question was only the width of the two doors combined.

Ernie_Fergler wrote:

I'm on board with you on that one.

A. Spruce wrote:

You know how it is, Ernie, some things you just can't learn from Google.

Ernie_Fergler wrote:

I can't fathom spacing outlets 12' apart. Nor would local inspectors allow it.
Say you place table lamp 1 at an outlet. Table lamp 2 will be placed 12' away. Even if you would drag those two lamps together they are six feet away from each other. Not to mention placing a Wave radio or small TV in between the two lamps. How would that fit into all that and still be energized?.

Unless its a local rule/ammendment that's just bogus. Name the jurisdiction, inspector and citation. Your not being able to fathom the general Code rule for regular dwelling units, I'll reserve comment. I'll also reserve comment on your personal attacks as well as your "belief" system(s). However, regarding the NEC you are not interpreting nor applying the the minimum rule correctly.

Receptacles 12' apart allow for no point on the wall being greater than 6' from a receptacle: that's the NEC rule. Wisconsin uses the NEC. Portable Lamps (UL 153) have cords, if your cord is too short get an extension or replace the cord with a longer one. If you want a 3rd lamp closer to your lamp 1 location than you can accomodate by pluging it into receptacle 2 location, plug it into the same outlet location as your lamp 1, duplex receptacles are the norm. Your decorating concerns aside, the code is a minimum rule. It is not a design nor a decorating guide.

2008 NEC:

210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets. This section
provides requirements for 125-volt, 15- and 20-ampere re-
ceptacle outlets. The receptacles required by this section
shall be in addition to any receptacle that is:

  • (1) Part of a luminaire or appliance, or
  • (2) Controlled by a wall switch in accordance with 210.70(A)(1), Exception No. 1, or
  • (3) Located within cabinets or cupboards, or
  • (4) Located more than 1.7 in (5-1/2 ft) above the floor

Permanently installed electric baseboard heaters equipped
with factory-installed receptacle outlets or outlets provided as
a separate assembly by the manufacturer shall be permitted as
the required outlet or outlets for the wall space utilized by
such permanently installed heaters. Such receptacle outlets
shall not be connected to the heater circuits.
FPN: Listed baseboard heaters include instructions that may not permit their installation below receptacle outlets.
(A) General Provisions. In every kitchen, family room,
dining room, living room, parlor, library, den, sunroom,
bedroom, recreation room, or similar room or area of
dwelling units, receptacle outlets shall be installed in accor-
dance with the general provisions specified in 210.52(A)(1)
through (A)(3).

(1) Spacing. Receptacles shall be installed such that no
point measured horizontally along the floor line in any wall
space is more than 1.8 m (6 ft) from a receptacle outlet. (That's 12 ft apart!!!)

(2) Wall Space. As used in this section, a wall space shall

include the following:

  • (1) Any space 600 mm (2 ft) or more in width (including space measured around corners) and unbroken along the floor line by doorways, fireplaces, and similar openings.
  • (2) The space occupied by fixed panels in exterior walls, excluding sliding panels
  • (3) The space afforded by fixed room dividers such as free-standing bar-type counters or railings

(3) Floor Receptacles. Receptacle outlets in floors shall
not be counted as part of the required number of receptacle
outlets unless located within 450 mm (18 in.) of the wall.

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: outlets and junction box

Since the Original Poster hasn't returned, continuing this discussion is akin to buying oats for a deceased equine.

Enough flogging of the deceased equine, unless you're set upon macerating the proverbial deceased equine until it renders into soup.

As for your continued arguments and personal attacks they are of the caliber and substance of equine excrement.

A. Spruce
Re: outlets and junction box

:rolleyes:

JLMCDANIEL
Re: outlets and junction box

Well, I can certainly understand why the OP hasn't returned. He asked a question about outlets, a commonly used term to refer to the receptacle, cover plate, mounting box, mounting hard ware, and associated wiring. It may not be a scientific, engineering, code, or nit picking individual part name but is prevalent in everyday language used by home owners and trades people alike just like saying they want a switch installed and meaning the switch, the box wiring etc.

The NEC requirement is based on the assumption that electrical appliances will have standard 6 foot cords and no mater where you place it on the wall the cord should reach an outlet without and extension cord. That allows receptacles to be 12' apart. However, as I said before it doesn't matter what the NEC says, what matters is the interpretation and requirements of the locale jurisdictions and their inspectors. Most I have dealt with require the outlets to be no more than 6' apart and one even required them every 4'.
Jack

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: outlets and junction box
jkirk wrote:

i think we found our new lionhearted....

if i remember correctly, a max of 12 ' apart for outlets within dwelling spaces such as living rooms and bedrooms,

for kitchens, there must be a recepticle every 4ft of counter space. and they must be a gfci if within 3' of a water source

the simples way to ask the original question is to say how many outlets + lights can be on one circuit without overloading

by having outlets closer together, obviously you will create more outlets which in turn means more circuits at the panel. by not knowing how many outlets you can have on a circuit and not knowing how to check how many are on it could create a risk of fire or overloading a panel. Which has happened, i know this not by google but from electricians i know who have seen it first hand and had to rewire entire houses after it has happened

when it comes to do it yourself projects there are limits to which diy'ers should go, when personal saftey and put the building at risk of fire, flooding, severe structural damage consult or hire a professional. looking things up online can help but there is no way of knowing the persons crudentials are true. theres nothing more assuring than having a certified Professional in your home, directly looking at what you want done.

More horse's ptooties heard from.

dwellings residential we are not limited to the number of recepticals on a circuit. all of our kitchen countertop receptacles (small appliance rules) have to be gfci protected.

The original poster is from Wisconsin not Canada.

99 percent of new users don't return to the forum. 95 percent of new users who do post one time or a series of posts at their first visit, then never log in again.

Don't believe any of your inspector stories. Code inspectors have to cite code references in their citations. unless you can prove there was some wacky local ammendment don't believe your stories.

Pages

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.