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jim swett
out door faucet

are the bonnets they sell for them really effective in cold weather?

MSSP
Re: out door faucet

it helps a little, IMO. I was told as an aprentice years ago you can put a mink coat on a bucket of water and it will still freeze. you have to have heat for a water line not to freeze. If it is a frost free hydrant then you shouldnt have a problem.

ed21
Re: out door faucet

What mssp said. If the hose bib is not a frost proof style, then the water needs to be turned off inside and the valve outside left open and drained of water if possible. Cover the open end with cloth to keep out bugs.
Depends where you live too. South Carolina is different than Michigan.

Fencepost
Re: out door faucet

At my church we had a "frost free" hose bibb -- the kind that drains itself -- poking outside from a sink cabinet on an uninsulated wall. The inside portion of the faucet is attached to a brass street ell, which is attached to a brass ball valve.

Last winter we had an extreme cold snap, and even though the water was shut off at the ball valve, and the faucet was drained, the ball valve froze and split, flooding the church kitchen.

What I figure happened is this: Due to the extreme cold (single-digits), heat was conducted along the metal body of the hose bibb fast enough to cause the ball valve to freeze. The thermostat was set to 50 degrees but, even though the cabinet door was open, there was insufficient heat in the building to counteract the heat loss through the metal components.

After repairing the damage, we now cover the hose bibb with one of those styrofoam hats. Our hope is that it will reduce heat loss enough to prevent freezing.

canuk
Re: out door faucet
Fencepost wrote:

At my church we had a "frost free" hose bibb -- the kind that drains itself -- poking outside from a sink cabinet on an uninsulated wall. The inside portion of the faucet is attached to a brass street ell, which is attached to a brass ball valve.

Last winter we had an extreme cold snap, and even though the water was shut off at the ball valve, and the faucet was drained, the ball valve froze and split, flooding the church kitchen.

What I figure happened is this: Due to the extreme cold (single-digits), heat was conducted along the metal body of the hose bibb fast enough to cause the ball valve to freeze. The thermostat was set to 50 degrees but, even though the cabinet door was open, there was insufficient heat in the building to counteract the heat loss through the metal components.

After repairing the damage, we now cover the hose bibb with one of those styrofoam hats. Our hope is that it will reduce heat loss enough to prevent freezing.

Considering we have minus double digit temperatures during the winter you don't find outside faucets covered with sweaters, Mink , or foam --- it's rare to have frozen or burst pipes --- frost free or not.

The water is shutoff inside and the line is drained with the tap outside left in the *open* position. This allows any residule water that freezes to ice an avenue to expand outward.

In most cases 9 times out of 10 the problem with freezing pipes is due to cold air drafts. Usually the hole made to allow the piping to the outside tap is large and not sealed. Sealing the hole around the pipe prevents the cold outside air from freezing the inside piping.

The 1 of 10 that does freeze is mainly from someone that didn't shut off the water and drain the line.

Fencepost
Re: out door faucet

"Extreme cold" where I live in the Pacific Northwet is anything below 15F. In Florida, it's probably anything below 50F. Up in Canuk's territory, I wouldn't expect anything above -20F to be considered extreme :cool:

Basically, it boils down to the coldest temperature you are prepared for: anything colder is extreme.

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