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pventresca
Old Toilet Parts
A. Spruce
Re: Old Toilet Parts

Any hardware store should have parts for the older style of toilet. If the toilet is an antique, then you may need to go to a restoration hardware specialty store ******.

If you can convert the fill valve to the new style, you'll be happier with the performance than than of the old ball and arm style valves.

kerrykuta12
Re: Old Toilet Parts

Old toilet parts are the cheaper but most of them in it are very damaged.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Old Toilet Parts

You don't necessarily need to replace the innards with the exact same set up. There are newer configurations that will get the job done the same. The decifing factors will be how much room there is in your tank. Most DIY stores will carry what you can use. The newer designs are smaller, take less room and can fill a toilet quicker.

If you want to "restore" your toilet, go to an old plumbing store. One that looks like they haven't changed their inventory since Eisenhower. We have a few in Houston like that. The old guys who work there will know what you need.

jstevejobs
Re: Old Toilet Parts

i think its hard to find good one , so better to replace whole thing

mtngigi
Re: Old Toilet Parts
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

You don't necessarily need to replace the innards with the exact same set up. There are newer configurations that will get the job done the same. The decifing factors will be how much room there is in your tank. Most DIY stores will carry what you can use. The newer designs are smaller, take less room and can fill a toilet quicker.

If you want to "restore" your toilet, go to an old plumbing store. One that looks like they haven't changed their inventory since Eisenhower. We have a few in Houston like that. The old guys who work there will know what you need.

I was going to start a thread along these same lines - hope it's ok to butt in rather than start a similar thread. I was wondering if new parts are interchangealble with older parts (not really sure how old mine are, but the attached photo is what I need to replace (I think it's called a float valve?).

I've looked at videos and I'm pretty sure can do this, just wondering if the newer ones I saw on HD's website will work to replace mine.

Also, to the original poster - there seem to be lots of free toilets listed on Craigslist on a regular basis, so you might find the parts you need from that source. I know when I can afford a new toilet and installation, I'll be offering mine for free on CL.

Fencepost
Re: Old Toilet Parts

My church has toilets made in 1946 and modern replacement fill valves (Fluidmaster, for example) fit just fine. Other than flow rates, the basic design of the American flush toilet hasn't changed in several generations.

Russia, on the other hand, has some toilets that make you ask, "What were they thinking?"

mtngigi
Re: Old Toilet Parts
Fencepost wrote:

My church has toilets made in 1946 and modern replacement fill valves (Fluidmaster, for example) fit just fine. Other than flow rates, the basic design of the American flush toilet hasn't changed in several generations.

Russia, on the other hand, has some toilets that make you ask, "What were they thinking?"

Well, now you're going to have to post a photo of a Russian toilet. :rolleyes:

So I should ask for a "fill valve" when I go to get that part? My house was built in 1937, but I don't think the toilet is that old. Hopefully a new one will fit, as you say it will. If not, I know where to find you (in Russia, taking pictures of toilets).

Mastercarpentry
Re: Old Toilet Parts

Yep- you want a "Fill Valve assembly" and it's an easy job. From the big-box stores I prefer the "Korky" ones- they last longer than the "Fluidmaster" and are far less prone to reduced water flow from any small debris in old pipes. Since you sem to have not done this job before here's a quick overview on 'how to':

Turn off the supply valve then flush. There should not be any water coming in- if thee is turn the water off to the whole house. Replacing the supply valve itself might be a good idea at that point but not really necessary. Next place an old towel under the fill valve and remove the supply line. If it's old and not copper go ahead and replace it too for peace of mind. They come in different lengths so get the right one. Next, take an old sponge and absorb the excess water in the tank, squeezing it out in the bowl till it's fairly dry. Change out the fill valve and reverse the above steps. Turn the water on and check for leaks, then note where the water stops filling. This is often indicated on the tank itself, but if not an inch below the top of the standing overflow pipe in the center of the tank usually works well. Turn off the supply valve when adjusting water level as some brands are under pressure and can fly up and apart if you don't have a firm grasp in them and the water is on- you don't want a geyser! When you have the level right and the setting secured as the manufacturer states, flush a few times to ensure the setting is stable and put the lid back on. With a good fill valve you can forget about it for 10+ years.

Phil

dj1
Re: Old Toilet Parts
Mastercarpentry wrote:

Yep- you want a "Fill Valve assembly" and it's an easy job. From the big-box stores I prefer the "Korky" ones- they last longer than the "Fluidmaster" and are far less prone to reduced water flow from any small debris in old pipes. Since you sem to have not done this job before here's a quick overview on 'how to':

Turn off the supply valve then flush. There should not be any water coming in- if thee is turn the water off to the whole house. Replacing the supply valve itself might be a good idea at that point but not really necessary. Next place an old towel under the fill valve and remove the supply line. If it's old and not copper go ahead and replace it too for peace of mind. They come in different lengths so get the right one. Next, take an old sponge and absorb the excess water in the tank, squeezing it out in the bowl till it's fairly dry. Change out the fill valve and reverse the above steps. Turn the water on and check for leaks, then note where the water stops filling. This is often indicated on the tank itself, but if not an inch below the top of the standing overflow pipe in the center of the tank usually works well. Turn off the supply valve when adjusting water level as some brands are under pressure and can fly up and apart if you don't have a firm grasp in them and the water is on- you don't want a geyser! When you have the level right and the setting secured as the manufacturer states, flush a few times to ensure the setting is stable and put the lid back on. With a good fill valve you can forget about it for 10+ years.

Phil

Phil's "how to" lesson is all you need to know.

Let me add this: when you shut off the water supply to the tank at the angle stop (valve), there should be no water coming in the tank and no leaks at the valve. If you need to stop the water at the main (entire house), it's time to replace this defective angle stop. Check the nipple (the pipe coming out the wall) as well - if not copper but galvanized, it might have rust build up, and needs to be replaced.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Old Toilet Parts
dj1 wrote:

...Check the nipple (the pipe coming out the wall) as well - if not copper but galvanized, it might have rust build up, and needs to be replaced.

I forgot about those little beggars- thanks for the addition!

Phil

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