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DIMySelfSandy
old air compressor
DIMySelfSandy

A friend gave me an old Craftsman air compressor (1.5 hp, 3gal, 125 psi) I know a little about these but I need to know how to tell when this needs to be re-oilded or lubricated. I also need to know if this would have enough umph to use a nail gun on, or is it too weak?

A. Spruce
Re: old air compressor
A. Spruce

Check the Craftsman website for an owners manual. In it you should find the regular service interval, what type of oil to use, etc. If you can't find the manual or that information, contact a Craftsman service center (usually attached to a Sears ).

That should be more than enough to run a nail gun, the worst that's going to happen is you'll have to periodically wait for the compressor to catch up, depending on how big the gun is and how fast you're using it.

sabo4545
Re: old air compressor
sabo4545

I agree on checking the website for the oiling info if it does indeed take oil. There are a lot of oil-less compressors out there.

As far as running the nail gun I have a pancake compressor that is 2.5gal and it has no problem running a framing nailer or roofing nailer. It is better suited to finish nailer as it will start up often with the big guns but sometimes I don't want to drag the big compressor with me.

Fencepost
Re: old air compressor
Fencepost

The key numbers to use when deciding if this will run a particular tool is the continuous flow rate. This compressor is capable of 2.45 GPM at 90 PSI, or 3.75 GPM @ 40 PSI.

All air tools are rated as requiring some minimum amount of flow at some pressure, usually at either 90 or 40 PSI. Momentary tools -- such as nailguns -- can get by with a lower flow rate than is specified if you are very patient. However, if you are doing a LOT of nailing, as when installing roofing, you will probably need a compressor that can supply the nailgun's stated requirement. Continous-flow tools -- such as an impact wrench or a spray gun -- should not be used with a compressor rated lower than the tool's demands.

Your compressor appears to one requiring oil. The black knob on the right end of the compressor is where you check the oil; this knob should have a dipstick. If the oil is discolored, it should be changed. Do not use motor oil; use compressor oil. As for frequency, that depends on the manufacturer's recommendation and your usage. Check the owner's manual for instructions on changing the oil.

Go to the Sears Parts Direct website, punch in the model number of the compressor, and you should be able to get the manual.

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