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techguy
oil furnace removal
techguy

hi, i have a 10 year old oil furnace in my basement that no longer works and is not hooked up anymore (we coverted the house to heat pump) im sure i can just take a sledge to it and take it out in parts; but are their any special things for me to do to disconnect the oil lines and do i need to do anything with the outside tank. its in the ground. like fill it with concrete and dirt?

thanks all for the help

:D

A. Spruce
Re: oil furnace removal
A. Spruce

There are all kinds of EPA regulations for dealing with buried tanks, such as having them pumped, cleaned, then removed. If they were leaking then there are remedial issues to be dealt with.

I would recommend checking with your local building department, EPA office, or governing body for underground tanks before proceeding. Like everything else, there are likely heavy fines for not disclosing and dealing with underground tanks properly. Know what you're getting into before you start.

techguy
Re: oil furnace removal
techguy

good point. ok i looked up my areas rules and i tracked down the answer

"What do I need to do if I no longer want to use the tank?
If it is less than 1,100 gallons, you may remove it or you may pump out all remaining fuel and fill it
with sand or other solid, inert material. If the tank is greater than 1,100 gallons you must hire a
certified contractor* to either remove or properly abandon the tank. Soil samples must be taken at the
time of removal or abandonment to determine if the tank leaked. Contact the Tank Management
Branch for instructions and a list of certified contractors."

its under that so i should be good, just gonna need lot of sand :P
any suggestions on how to cap those lines off, of course soldering ends on is out of the question

NashuaTech
Re: oil furnace removal
NashuaTech

What Spruce said has direct application; also, you should not touch any of the old equipment until you get at least one or two estimates from local fuel oil dealers or oil burner repairmen (the estimates are free, and will give you a lot of practical info as to the pitfalls and problems involved before you touch this equipment, which can be dangerous in a number of ways).

You state the old equipment is a "furnace", but many people in fact mean "boiler" when they use this term---old boiler equipment is very dangerous to disassemble for a number of reasons-----asbestos insulation on older equipment is one; on boilers there are usually cast iron sections that are VERY DANGEROUS to disassemble; there are numerous cases of a DIYr losing an arm and worse when attempting combustion chamber removals---all of these issues will be explained & pointed out when you have a contractor in the cellar to evaluate before you hire anyone; guidelines for tying the fuel lines, decommissioning the fuel tank, and other issues will also be covered.

If the estimate is reasonable, I strongly recommend having the heating contractor do the work; another option in many towns is the city's recycling program where they will have city workers come in to remove the old equipment for the scrap metal involved; a number of demolition and salvage companies (check Yellow Pages) often charge a token fee for this service for the same reason.

rslocum
Re: oil furnace removal - disconnecting fuel line
rslocum

Hi, I have a furnace and tank that are not disconnected yet but I need them to be. The tank is empty and the furnace doesn't work anymore. Can I do it myself?

ed21
Re: oil furnace removal
ed21

I think if you read the previous responses you'll have a good idea of what needs to be done.

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