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LeahM
Oak floor refinishing
LeahM

Hello I just purchased my first home in December. It was built in 1933. I love my old house. We finally got around to ripping up the carpet in the dining room and the oak (I think it's oak) flooring underneath had a beautiful finish, except they only went around the outside of the room (like they went around a rug. It appears to have been covered with carpet most of it's life. The wood in the middle is untouched, unfinished while the outside has a waxy thick finish.

I was wondering how to go about refinishing the floor. Do I just treat it all the same? Should I treat the unfinished stuff with something first? Should I treat the finished stuff with something first. Obviously I can sand it all down quite a bit as they are great/thick boards and in great shape, but just can't figure out if I need to treat the wood differently. It would have been so much easier if they had done the whole thing, I'm stumped. Here is a photo.

dj1
Re: Oak floor refinishing
dj1

To have exceptional results, sand the whole floor to the hardwood and stain. To have unacceptable results, just finish the area where the rug was.

You can rent an orbital sander, buy the sand paper and the stains OR hire professional floor refinishers (which I would do). Keep in mind that it will be a dusty job, and you will have to remove all furniture.

Buy a round trip ticket to the islands so you don't see the mess.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Oak floor refinishing
Mastercarpentry

Floor refinishing is something of an art. Before letting someone do it, first see some of their recent work. Don't let the shine dazzle you; look for sanding marks, flatness, and an even appearance everywhere, especially the edges.

I do some of these for rentals but I'd hire somebody to do mine rather than make the attempt myself because I know how good I ain't and I've got more experience than you!

Phil

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Oak floor refinishing
Sombreuil_mongrel

What you have is the economy model; the softwood (less costly) was used in the center where it would always be covered by an area rug, and the more expensive wood was done at the perimeter. They will not ever look like a single matching floor, because they are two different species. Most of the time, the softwood center panel was not even varnished or anything; they saved their $$
Casey

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