Home>Discussions>ELECTRICAL & LIGHTING>No ventilation in Victorian bathroom - how hard to put in exhaust fan system??
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TOTALN00B
No ventilation in Victorian bathroom - how hard to put in exhaust fan system??

I'm in escrow on a 125-year-old Victorian that needs various work done. One of the problems is that there is only one tiny bathroom, off the kitchen, and it has absolutely no ventilation. The two tall windows are an odd size, 8 panes, and they are original to the house so I would like to keep them. They are in good shape. Only problem is, they are not the kind of window that opens. So I'm looking at alternative ways to let moist air out.

What about an exhaust ceiling fan, like you see in apartment bathrooms with no windows? Would a ventilation system like this have to go through the attic?? I don't have an attic above the bathroom, since it was converted to a second floor with bedrooms in 1906. How difficult would this be without an attic? And do I need a plumber to install a new ventilation system, or what? :o

I have no idea how this bathroom was kept so clean all these years, with no way for the moist air to get out. He must have never taken showers??? :confused: I plan to convert the space above this bathroom into a second bathroom eventually, but do not currently have the funds to do so, so I need to make the current bathroom usable.

There is also the small problem of having a radio hard-wired inside the shower stall... Maybe the shower was only used for listening to music? ;)

drewp
Re: No ventilation in Victorian bathroom - how hard to put in exhaust fan system??

Several years ago I installed a ceiling ventilation fan with a light in my daughter's bathroom. I would say the trickiest part was getting power up there for there previously wasn't any ceiling light fixture. I fortunately was able to remove some of the floor boards from the attic space above so that I could run power from the light switch up into the ceiling space. If you already have a light fixture in the ceiling in the approximate space you want to install the fan...you're in luck. Installing the fan was then a piece of cake. You have to make sure that your ceiling joists run perpendicular to your outside wall so that you can run the ductwork to the outside. Once the fan was installed, I cut out a circular hole slightly larger than the ductwork diameter on the outside wall and fed the rigid ductwork in until it reached the fan and hooked everything up. I am not an electrician (although my father was) and I did do home construction in college SO take this on only if you feel comfortable with your abilities.

motoguy128
Re: No ventilation in Victorian bathroom - how hard to put in exhaust fan system??

IF yu have some tight space issues, there are fans that are remotely mounted (Fantech makes some good ones). SO if you can at least get some ductwork to the room in the form of wall stack, then you can mount the fan in a basement or crawlspace.

I have a small 1/2 bath under y main staircase that has no ventilation. Not shower, but ventilation for ummm odors... would be nice. I plan to eventually mount a fan in the basement for constant ventilation and run ducts to the kitchen, bath and garage to a common 6" fan.

Nathalie
Re: No ventilation in Victorian bathroom - how hard to put in exhaust fan system??

I've seen ventilation unit fans that instead of being installed on the ceiling can be installed above a bathroom window or on a wall leading directly to the outside. Maybe this kind would be easier to install especially if the space is small.

Fencepost
Re: No ventilation in Victorian bathroom - how hard to put in exhaust fan system??

There's no rule that the fan has to be mounted in the ceiling. You may find it easier to mount it on the exterior wall... venting is a breeze (pardon the pun).

Brookworld
Re: No ventilation in Victorian bathroom - how hard to put in exhaust fan system??
Fencepost wrote:

There's no rule that the fan has to be mounted in the ceiling. You may find it easier to mount it on the exterior wall... venting is a breeze (pardon the pun).

Although not positive about this, I believe there are thru-the-wall units (basically "short" enough to fit through exterior wall framed by 2x4 & drywall/siding from Panasonic & others).

The problem is getting electrical power, installing a switch and having to repair plaster walls to get this done.
The duct opening on the outside should have a damper to close the duct; otherwise, the winter outdoors will make in to the room.

I've heard about this but not researched it.

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