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andymcclure
New Windows in a Pitched Porch
andymcclure

I could use a little advice (or a clever trick) on a window installation I'm planning.

I have an 1912 craftsman-ish home. It is very solid structurally, and most of my improvement projects have involved updating wiring and plumbing or are mostly cosmetic.

The house has a front porch that was probably exposed on all sides in 1912. At some point (probably 1950s-ish) it was converted to an enclosed porch with aluminum storm windows installed more like regular windows. Time has not been kind to these aluminum windows, and I'd like to replace them with some basic vinyl double-glazed windows. In this climate (Minnesota), it's kind of a 2-season porch, and I'd like to get it to more of a 3-season (maybe even 3 1/2).

Here's my problem: the porch has a pretty significant pitch, about 1" over 6'. I assume this was intentional, as the top of the frame is more or less level. The previous solution involved cramming aluminum storm windows in place, shooting the edges full of absurd amounts of caulk, and discontinuing use as they sagged and quit working.

Does anyone have any advice or ideas on what to do with the bottom edge of the new windows? It would be relatively easy to level them as usual, just with more extensive shimming. (Easier install, nightmare to finish/trim.) Or, would it be better to create a level "sill" on top of the existing sill? (More involved install, easier to finish/trim.) Or, any other clever ideas?

Alternatively, am I nuts to even consider this?

Thanks!

HoustonRemodeler
Re: New Windows in a Pitched Porch
HoustonRemodeler

Are these windows touching the floor? Why not install shorter windows ?

A. Spruce
Re: New Windows in a Pitched Porch
A. Spruce

The shape of the opening has very little to do with how to properly install a window. A window should be hung plumb and level. Best case scenario is leaving an even reveal around the perimeter so that trim work fits nice and even. If the opening is out of whack, you can shim the trim/drywall to make it parallel to the window frame. If shimming is not your thing, then creating an actual plumb/level opening is the route to go.

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