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Lin
new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

Three weeks ago had our driveway enlarged - which meant the previous driveway (probably 30 years old - not in terrible shape by any means) was torn out and adjoining grassy area was paved. We asked around for recommendations and got bids. Company selected removed old driveway and dug out new section. They put down different sizes of gravel for base ... packed it down. Put down asphalt. Rolled it. Told us to stay off for 3 days. Looked great.

We actually waited more than a week before driving on it, and noticed this week when driveway was wet that there are definitely tire tread marks and depression in this new driveway. We've taken pics and contacted the company that installed (still waiting for them to reply).

Any ideas what is causing this? Its been warm outside, but nothing hot enough to "melt" asphalt. We're not parking heavy vehicles on it either. We've had other driveways put in in different states, etc., and never witnessed this.

dj1
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

If they did everything right in the prep phase, then there is something wrong with the asphalt. But then again,, they can claim that in hot weather the asphalt gets soft, which is a valid claim. Or they will choose to wait until the weather cools down a bit to inspect.

Most likely, they buy the asphalt, not make it, but still, they are supposed to stand behind their materials.

Give them a chance to inspect and determine what to do, before you make your next move.

Lin
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

Thanks for advise. Guess maybe asphalt &/or "IF" prep was done correctly is the concern right now - certainly seemed as though they did proper prep.

Have taken pics of the tread marks and depressions, and sent them along to pavers - in the meantime, we're staying off driveway. We will give them some time to reply to concerns.

If they say the hot weather caused asphalt to get too soft for cars, won't the colder weather only cause these depressions to become permanent? Seems like "if" asphalt is this pliable 3 wks later (in high 70s/low 80s), maybe now would be the time to re-roll or re-do if necessary???

They are rated with BBB, but hopefully this can be worked out w/o going that route.

dj1 wrote:

If they did everything right in the prep phase, then there is something wrong with the asphalt. But then again,, they can claim that in hot weather the asphalt gets soft, which is a valid claim. Or they will choose to wait until the weather cools down a bit to inspect.

Most likely, they buy the asphalt, not make it, but still, they are supposed to stand behind their materials.

Give them a chance to inspect and determine what to do, before you make your next move.

MLB Construction
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

one question.....did they put down a base coat, which has larger aggregate than the top coat? or did they simply put two layers of top coat down?

Clarence
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

MLB has it correct NO BASE coat.

Lin
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

.... dunno ... while we were watching some of the process, recall seeing a machine "spraying" and then rolling (after different size gravel was used for base, and "packed down" with machine). Don't recall the spray looking any different - all was dropped into sprayer from one dump truck (so assume it was the "same" product).

They said they were putting down 3" and rolling to 2.5", but again how do we, as "watchers" know that's indeed the depth - w/o digging up?

MLB Construction wrote:

one question.....did they put down a base coat, which has larger aggregate than the top coat? or did they simply put two layers of top coat down?

Lin
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

So what the heck is the solution here - when a paver doesn't put down a "base coat"? :confused:

And how would the average Joe Smoe Homeowner know this, or know to look for this during installation process?

Clarence wrote:

MLB has it correct NO BASE coat.

MLB Construction
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

unfortunately for you, the only way you would know would be to ask any questions beforehand. the most important thing that is stressed on this forum more than constantly is to use reputable contractors and ALWAYS check references. hopefully, you used a good contractor that's concerned with keeping their customers happy. i would call them, explain what happened, ask how they put the driveway down, meaning the process they used and the materials and ask them to come take a look at it. a hot day is no excuse at all, if it was then every highway and parking lot in the country would have tire tread marks on it. if they just blow you off, have another "reputable" paving contractor come take a look at it, maybe drill out a sample, and put something in writing for you. even if you have to pay him for an hour of his time. this way you will have some ammo against the company that did the work and you could take them to small claims court.

Fencepost
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"
crylakel wrote:

.... dunno ... while we were watching some of the process, recall seeing a machine "spraying" and then rolling (after different size gravel was used for base, and "packed down" with machine). Don't recall the spray looking any different - all was dropped into sprayer from one dump truck (so assume it was the "same" product).

They said they were putting down 3" and rolling to 2.5", but again how do we, as "watchers" know that's indeed the depth - w/o digging up?

Sprayed liquid asphalt covered with gravel is not the same as hotmix pavement. That's typically called a Macadam surface, also known as successive chip seal or oil mat. It's usually packed down with a roller. Macadam hardens by evaporation of volatile solvents.

Hotmix asphalt pavement is a mix of gravel and asphalt prepared an a factory ("batch plant") and brought to the site in dump trucks. It's jet black. The asphalt is dumped out of the truck directly into a spreading machine, then followed up with a roller to pack it down. Hotmix asphalt hardens by cooling. Some volatile solvents evaporate over time, but the initial hardness is dependent on cooling.

Both surfaces require a base of packed crushed gravel. The base is usually what's known as "three quarter minus" which means that it's a mix of sizes from fines all the way up to 3/4" aggregate.

So knowing that, what did you observe being put down?

Lin
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

> brought to the site in dump trucks. It's jet black. The asphalt is dumped out of the truck directly into a spreading machine, then followed up with a roller to pack it down.

After excavation, the different sized gravels were dumped, spread & tamped - than a truck (just one dump truck) dumped a black mix into the spreading machine. It was sprayed out. They dumped a 2nd load in spreader & it too was sprayed. Than a roller machine went over it. Told us to stay off for 3 days.

Just heard back from the "paver" this a.m. - while he hasn't been out to take a look (said he's been straight out with other jobs), his response is the tire marks will wear in, & this happens on all new driveways.

> As for the tire marks, they will wear in. It happens on all new driveways. There is no need to stop driving on it.

Frankly, not feeling real comfortable w/his explanation based on what I've seen/heard now from others. But we'll start driving and parking on it again ...... what's the worse that can happen @ this point, 'cept it will look worse (which will likely make for "better" photos if we file complaint with BBB (company had an A rating) and/or take to small claims).

Fencepost wrote:

Sprayed liquid asphalt covered with gravel is not the same as hotmix pavement. That's typically called a Macadam surface, also known as successive chip seal or oil mat. It's usually packed down with a roller. Macadam hardens by evaporation of volatile solvents.

Hotmix asphalt pavement is a mix of gravel and asphalt prepared an a factory ("batch plant") and brought to the site in dump trucks. It's jet black. The asphalt is dumped out of the truck directly into a spreading machine, then followed up with a roller to pack it down. Hotmix asphalt hardens by cooling. Some volatile solvents evaporate over time, but the initial hardness is dependent on cooling.

Both surfaces require a base of packed crushed gravel. The base is usually what's known as "three quarter minus" which means that it's a mix of sizes from fines all the way up to 3/4" aggregate.

So knowing that, what did you observe being put down?

Mastercarpentry
Re: new asphalt driveway - can see tire tread "marks"

It is possible that it wasn't rolled adequately (mini-roller) or was rolled after it was too cooled to compact correctly but my guess is that you now live somewhere hot.

In hotter climes asphalt isn't used as much for driveways because it absorbs the sun's heat and softens. Here in Upstate SC with our 90+ degree summer days, it's normally used only for long driveways, then tied into concrete near the house because even done correctly a car can settle into it if it's parked in one spot for long leaving permanent depressions. It's more common when they used a mini-roller (not the huge ones you see on road paving projects) but even with big rollers and done at the right time, it's not uncommon to find these slight depressions when it's less than a year old. Just be glad you didn't park your new sports-touring bike on it as the kickstand would have sunk and it would have fallen over breaking the expensive plastic bodywork- another common experience with asphalt in hotter climes.

In parking lots and roads normal traffic eventually 'rolls' it all down pretty evenly, but driveways don't get that much traffic. It should 'drive in' and it will help if you don't drive just up the center, but stay 6-8" away from the edges which may crumble while it's new, and don't leave anything parked in one spot more than 24 hours for a few months.

Phil

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