Home>Discussions>ELECTRICAL & LIGHTING>Need help with a 100 amp subpanel
5 posts / 0 new
Last post
Terry
Need help with a 100 amp subpanel

I am selling a 25 year old home that had the basement finished in 2006.  At that time a 100 amp sub panel was added.  the buyers inspector says that I have to separate the commons and grounds in the panel that sits right next to the existing panel. is that correct?

 

Terry
Re: Need help with a 100 amp subpanel

So I did this and now every time I turn on a light the bulb goes out.   The installation was done with two wires and I don't see a common wire coming over from the existing panel. 

HandyAndyInMtAiry
Re: Need help with a 100 amp subpanel

Terry,

The inspector did that because the way that sub-panel was wired is against code. It should have been done right the first time. You need to supply power, neutral and ground to the sub-panel just like you would to any main panel. The sub-panel requires it's own ground rod. Without seeing any of the wiring you have, it is very difficult in making only assumptions. We have no idea what bulb you are referring. Use a meter to determine what is actually happening. Not lights.

Why would there be a sub-panel right against one of the main panels? Usually a sub-panel is added because one wants to seperate a certain area of the structure, like another floor, or a kitchen, or a garage. And it keeps one from having to run all the branch circuit wires all the way back to a main panel.

Andrew

Handy Andy In Mt Airy NC

Brad
Re: Need help with a 100 amp subpanel
HandyAndyInMtAiry wrote:

Terry,

The inspector did that because the way that sub-panel was wired is against code. It should have been done right the first time. You need to supply power, neutral and ground to the sub-panel just like you would to any main panel. The sub-panel requires it's own ground rod. Without seeing any of the wiring you have, it is very difficult in making only assumptions. We have no idea what bulb you are referring. Use a meter to determine what is actually happening. Not lights.

Why would there be a sub-panel right against one of the main panels? Usually a sub-panel is added because one wants to seperate a certain area of the structure, like another floor, or a kitchen, or a garage. And it keeps one from having to run all the branch circuit wires all the way back to a main panel.

Andrew

Handy Andy In Mt Airy NC

A subpanel within the same structure does NOT need its own ground rod. 

Jeremy
Re: Need help with a 100 amp subpanel

 Yes, and it will be easy to do. As the one gentleman said, you will not need a separate ground rod. You will need to provide a #8 awg ground wire from your main to your sub, provide a separate terminal ground bar and move all your grounds to it. You probably have the right ground going to your main already or that would have been mentioned separately. Oh and usually the reason for a sub next to a main is for more breaker space.

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.