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xyxoxy
Mushrooms?

I just noticed that a small portion of my yard suddenly seems to have hundreds of tiny beige mushroom looking thingys growing.

I've been here for 5 years and this is a first. However there was an old Sycamore tree there when we moved in which we cut down 4 years ago. Last year I used a new lawn patching product in this area to fill in where the tree was so it seems obvious that must have had something to do with it... though last year it was just nice new grass. The area is nice and sunny now that the Sycamore is gone so it's not a place I would expect to see funghi.

Any idea what this is or how to get rid of it?

canuk
Re: Mushrooms?

The mushroom fungi spores could be from any place ... it's common for them to be carried on the wind , from a neighboring yard or like you mentioned maybe in the material you used to patch the lawn.

However ... they feed on rotting organic matter like dead tree roots and stumps ... for example.
By the sounds of it .... the area where the mushrooms are appearing would be the roots of the tree that was removed are rotting under the grass along with the remaining stump.

I have the same thing around an area where a tree was taken down.... they sprout quite nicely in bright sunlight.

Another issue would be from poor drainage .... the soil remaining wet.

This is something that I noticed after the tree was removed .... this area seemed to have poor drainage and water accumulates more in this area. My theory is since the tree is gone the roots don't absorb the moisture like it once did when the tree was there.
So this has become a perfect environment with plenty of moisture decaying the the tree roots under the grass.

Here's a couple of links for some information :

http://www.lawncare-business.com/Lawn-Mushrooms.html
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74100.html

Hope this helps. :)

xyxoxy
Re: Mushrooms?

Yes, that helps a lot.
I suspect the roots are still undeground rotting away and feeding the shrooms. It's just odd that I didn't see them before now but I guess it took a couple of years to rot enough to feed the fungus.

Guess I'll either have to live with it or dig up my yard to replace the soil.

Thanks a lot for the info!

ed21
Re: Mushrooms?

the mushrooms won't hurt the lawn. Just rake them to break them off. You're right about them feeding on the roots. Replacing the soil won't help unless you get rid of all the dead roots.

xyxoxy
Re: Mushrooms?
ed21 wrote:

You're right about them feeding on the roots. Replacing the soil won't help unless you get rid of all the dead roots.

Yeah that's what I meant... dig out the roots and fill everything back in with clean new soil.

However I just looked again today and the mushrooms seem to have disappeared. If that's all the longer they last then I'm fine leaving them be. But I do have some spots that need to be filled and seeded anyway so maybe I'll add this to the list if time allows.

Thanks again.

AcidHorse
Re: Mushrooms?

The mushrooms fed off the nutrients that were still in the tree roots, yet the nutrients are gone in the roots and the soil above the tree roots is nutrient-poor as well; in mushroom cultivation this layer of soil or mulch is known as a "casing" layer. It is one factor that triggers fruiting of the mushrooms along with exposure to moisture then drainage or drying and temperature changes. One way to change the environment to make it unfavorable for them is to change the pH of the soil. If they like alkaline soils then a mulch of pine needles or an acidic mulch would deter their propagation. If they like acidic soils then neutralizing the soil with calcium carbonate should help.
If they like neutral pH then acidify the soil.
Once it rains or the soil is watered it will be absorbed into the ground.

Another way is by using yeasts which ferment organic matter, mushrooms do not tolerate alcohol. And if yeasts are present they ferment organic matter producing ethyl alcohol that inhibits the growth of other fungi. In addition the yeasts utilize the available nutrients putting the other inhibited fungi
in a bad situation. This effect also works on molds like trichoderma and mucors.
But this method would only be possible if the area is always moist and wet, areas with poor drainage.

AcidHorse
Re: Mushrooms?
xyxoxy wrote:

I just noticed that a small portion of my yard suddenly seems to have hundreds of tiny beige mushroom looking thingys growing.

If they look anything like this->

or like this

Consider yourself blessed and go get a stick of butter and a frying pan and batter and fry them up like fried chicken.

These are morels and they are expensive if you buy them at a store. And highly edible.

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: Mushrooms?

now i don't know if its coincidence or true but old lore and i've always done this and never had a mushroom or other fungus problem from a cut down stump, is that you plant a hens and chicks plant on the top of every stump that you cut down an old tree like a sycamore that if the hens make chicks then you'll never get mushrooms from rotting roots. we haven't yet had a mushroom or other fungus crop from a cut down tree (stump or roots) but i have seen mushrooms toad stools and other fungus of other kinds and sources growing in other areas from time to time.

hens and chicks plants are succulant type plants kind of like sedum but not thorny like cactus.

whenever i've picked a toad stool or mushroom and didnt want it to spread i've plucked with a plastic bag inverted over my hand like a glove and covered it. gotta pluck em before they curl and open - and you don't want to spread the spores -- if you do it wrong you'll end up with a real crop of them in a few days all over the lawn! so don't just rake them off and in because their spores will continue to ripen and spread with the wind!

p.s. i wouldn't trust an identification with a picture over the internet. if you're not privy to an expert in fungi identification i'd not pick from the lawn and cook up and eat just anything that grew in the yard lots of look-alike poisonous fungi are out there and you wouldn't want to risk sudden liver failure or some other negative reaction. if you have a person you can check with who is expert then well mabe i'd risk it but only if he or she ate em first!!

Re: Mushrooms?

This has been a interesting feed on mushrooms. I have the same problem, but I do not know the history of the lawn. We have tall white/orange mushrooms that grow in our backyard. Occasionally, I have to go out there and pull them up, as I have two beagles that love to eat whatever smells good.

I am afraid if they eat these mushrooms, they will get sick. So far, if they have eaten them, they have not gotten sick, or sick from those.

Not being an expert myself, I do realize that there are a lot of "copy cat" mushrooms that can be deadly.

Thanks for all the information,
Allison

AcidHorse
Re: Mushrooms?
697295 wrote:

This has been a interesting feed on mushrooms. I have the same problem, but I do not know the history of the lawn. We have tall white/orange mushrooms that grow in our backyard. Occasionally, I have to go out there and pull them up, as I have two beagles that love to eat whatever smells good.

I am afraid if they eat these mushrooms, they will get sick. So far, if they have eaten them, they have not gotten sick, or sick from those.

Not being an expert myself, I do realize that there are a lot of "copy cat" mushrooms that can be deadly.

Thanks for all the information,
Allison

Well that other guy obviously doesn't know what a morel is, yet
it seemed he wanted to just keep everyone out of the know and how.

Well there's the cover to a well known book on morels and for a fact there is no mushroom out there that looks "exactly" like a morel. The only ones you should watch out for are false morels but they don't have an appearance like the morels. Those bad ones look more like brains, than raisins, plus the caps of the bad ones are a bright reddish-orange color. Morels don't have that look.

Re: Mushrooms?

Thanks for posting the book cover. I do want to look up and learn more about the mushrooms.

This is a great starting point.

Thanks for sharing,
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