Home>Discussions>ELECTRICAL & LIGHTING>May 4th Show electrical error
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webuild4u
May 4th Show electrical error

The electrician in the show that day explained a code violation regarding wires not twisted together before placing them under a wirenut. Although it is very good practice and I would not recommend doing it any other way it is NOT A VIOLATION. He used this as one of the reasons to rewire the 3rd floor of that house >>> clearly not a reason. He also sited live wires ending "free" without being in a junction box, violation no doubt but easily fixed by shutting power and terminating in a box. By the way >>>Wirenuts are designed to hold the recommended amount of wires without twisting them, again not my recommendation but legal.

A. Spruce
Re: May 4th Show electrical error

I don't disagree with the things you stated, I would add, however, that relevant code issues are determined in the jurisdiction of the work and approval is at the discretion of the building inspector. I have failed an inspection for lack of twisting wires together before nutting. Is it a good practice? Absolutely. :cool:

Ernie_Fergler
Re: May 4th Show electrical error
webuild4u wrote:

The electrician in the show that day explained a code violation regarding wires not twisted together before placing them under a wirenut. Although it is very good practice and I would not recommend doing it any other way it is NOT A VIOLATION. He used this as one of the reasons to rewire the 3rd floor of that house >>> clearly not a reason. He also sited live wires ending "free" without being in a junction box, violation no doubt but easily fixed by shutting power and terminating in a box. By the way >>>Wirenuts are designed to hold the recommended amount of wires without twisting them, again not my recommendation but legal.

I did see that episode. While that floor did need to be brought up to todays codes, the explanation why was rather week in my opinion as well. I just never like to rewire someone else's work on that size of a job. Starting from new works best.
It is a long standing debate whether to twist or not to twist. Like the proper way to mount and outlet...
By the way, I always twist and always will. :D

JLMCDANIEL
Re: May 4th Show electrical error

NEC and manufacturers listing is a good guide line but is not the law. Locale jurisdictions can adopt the NEC or adopt their own more stringent requirements which is the law. As one inspector told me "we don't care what the NEC says, this is what we require."
Jack

canuk
Re: May 4th Show electrical error
Quote:

Locale jurisdictions can adopt the NEC or adopt their own more stringent requirements which is the law. As one inspector told me "we don't care what the NEC says, this is what we require."

So true .... it's the local guys that call the shots.

A. Spruce
Re: May 4th Show electrical error
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

As one inspector told me "we don't care what the NEC says, this is what we require."Jack

Agreed. I've been told on more than one occasion that regardless of what the code book says, it's up to the local jurisdiction and inspector what is permissible. That is to say, you can satisfy the code book, you can satisfy the local jurisdiction requirements, but it's ultimately up to the inspector whether you pass muster or not. I've been on both sides of the coin, where the jurisdiction is saying that I have to meet a certain standard which, IMHO is out of line, and the inspector lets me do something more reasonably. Conversely, I've also satisfied jurisdictional regulations, yet the inspector has a bug up his posterior and thinks he's God, so extra work must be done to satisfy him (if you can't find a way over his head).

Re: May 4th Show electrical error

A good electrician will always twist the wires together before putting on a wire nut. How many of you all have taken a wire nut off a set of neutrals and had them fly apart. To top it off it has a load on it and the lights go out. Now you are in the dark on a ladder. I'd like to kick the ladder out from underneath the guy or women who made that splice. Raise your Hand:eek:

Ernie_Fergler
Re: May 4th Show electrical error
canuk wrote:

So true .... it's the local guys that call the shots.

Very true:D

Dave357
Re: May 4th Show electrical error
canuk wrote:

So true .... it's the local guys that call the shots.

About 10 years ago in Elgin, IL we were building a strip mall (about 5 or 6 stores). We called for the final inspections and the electrical inspector showed up. He said,

"I know it's an old law, but it's never been repealed, so I still enforce it. All connections must be soldered."

I thought he was joking, cuz up until then he had been a reasonable guy to deal with.

This code dates back to the days of knob & tube, before wire nuts had been invented.

We had to open all of the boxes in all of the stores & solder the connections, then call for a re-inspection.

montwv
Re: May 4th Show electrical error

I once had a lady friend call me in a panic over a bathroom circuit that almost set her house on fire. She was using a blow dryer when she noticed the lights dim and the smell of smoke coming from the attic. She quickly knocked the main service breaker and called me. Upon inspecting the attic, I found a juction box with the feed wire insulation burnt and melted 3 ft. past the box. The nuetral side of the 12-2WG was the most damaged. The nuetrals in the junction were all in the proper sized wire nut, but were not twisted together. In time the spring weakened and the loose connection overheated.

I always make it my policy to twist the leads to the right with a good pair of side-cutters (lineman pliers)and then twist the wire nut on as tight as I can get it. In this way, the wire nut is really nothing more than a good insulator.

Proper circuit size and tight connections are the two most important things to remember in wiring. Steve

canuk
Re: May 4th Show electrical error
Dave357 wrote:

About 10 years ago in Elgin, IL we were building a strip mall (about 5 or 6 stores). We called for the final inspections and the electrical inspector showed up. He said,

"I know it's an old law, but it's never been repealed, so I still enforce it. All connections must be soldered."

I thought he was joking, cuz up until then he had been a reasonable guy to deal with.

This code dates back to the days of knob & tube, before wire nuts had been invented.

We had to open all of the boxes in all of the stores & solder the connections, then call for a re-inspection.

Now that's just plain scarey:eek:

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