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LauraW13
Major Remodel...General Contractor required??

I am hoping to be purchasing a 1910 farmhouse that is need of some major repair! I would prefer to hire a project manager and use some of my own trades people (friends or people I have used in the past), but have never done a project of this scale. Is it necessary to have a general contractor, or are there project managers that specialize in home renovations that could keep the project on track with various trades people? Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

dj1
Re: Major Remodel...General Contractor required??

In my state, a homeowner can do whatever he wishes to do on his property, except certain trades that are required to be done by licensed contractors. For example: a homeowner can replace all his outlets and switches himself, but he needs a lic. electrician to get his main electrical panel replaced.

I would think that you could do any of the things you mentioned. If you get a GC or a manager to run your project, put it in writing if you want your subcontractors to participate. In fact make sure everything is in writing, including completion date.

If you haven't done anything this large, you will benefit from hiring an reputable, honest, recommended GC to schedule the work process, to accept material deliveries, to avoid mistakes, to meet with the inspector and so on.

Good luck, I hope you have a smooth deal.

[email protected]..
Re: Major Remodel...General Contractor required??

Some areas may require a GC to pull the permit and head up the job. Others may allow you to do it, but may make you sign some paperwork saying you'll live in the home upon completion for x amount of years. Or maybe they'll be glad you're improving the area in a tough economy and say, 'Welcome. How can we help?'

If you have people you've 'used in the past' it sounds like you're no rookie. A bigger scale job will only be more of a challenge with more details. People have been buying and renovating houses themselves for generations. Isn't it part of our Amer. Dream?... It's A Wonderful Life, Up, The Notebook, The Money Pit. If you want to oversee this project yourself, I'd say go for it. Renovating a house is an adventure. It may not be easy, but it's a blast. You can hire someone to do everything for you, but if you do you'll miss out on lots of the fun. A 100 year farm house sounds like a gt. project.

A. Spruce
Re: Major Remodel...General Contractor required??
LauraW13 wrote:

I am hoping to be purchasing a 1910 farmhouse that is need of some major repair! I would prefer to hire a project manager and use some of my own trades people (friends or people I have used in the past), but have never done a project of this scale. Is it necessary to have a general contractor, or are there project managers that specialize in home renovations that could keep the project on track with various trades people? Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

This sounds like a big can of worms. You may be able to find a project manager who would be willing to use your people, but expect to pay big bucks for it, I know I wouldn't do it.

The reason being, as a GC I know my sub contractors, their abilities, temperaments, and time tables. Like a ballet, we orchestrate our trades to work within each others needs and time frames. For me to rely on your friends and contacts means that I have no control over the final product or time schedule, particularly if your contacts are not actual licensed tradesmen that are familiar with a construction site.

Ultimately, when things go wrong, the manager is going to take the blame, when it's more likely due to circumstances beyond their control.

You can GC your own project as an owner/builder. There are a lot of books and videos on the subject. TOH and Home Time have both covered owner/builder/GC projects and how to make them run smoothly. Do your research, lay out a schedule, and get bids from everyone that will be touching your project. Before starting work, make sure you have signed contracts with everyone providing goods and services to you, even friends.

Clarence
Re: Major Remodel...General Contractor required??

Spruce is correct.
As a sub-contractor I look at it like the army in battle.
The best General will win the war.
Also there are some Generals that I will not serve under.

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