5 posts / 0 new
Last post
grodell
Lumber to countertop

I have access to home milled oak drying for 20 years and am wondering what to do from here to turn the lumber into countertops for my kitchen.

Ginger

theAdviserMe
Re: Lumber to countertop

Maybe you should just hire somebody specializing on countertop making. Or else you can scour the whole of the internet to find the right guide and information.

Anyway, good luck. Please post pics once everything is done. ;)

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Lumber to countertop
grodell wrote:

I have access to home milled oak drying for 20 years and am wondering what to do from here to turn the lumber into countertops for my kitchen.

Ginger

Ginger, how thick is the oak? Do you want a flat top or a butcher block top? What wood working tools do you have available?
Jack

grodell
Re: Lumber to countertop

The lumber is 2" rough sawn, I want flat top, and I have access to a college woodworking lab. Mill, planer, jointer, drum table sander, miter saw, band saw, table saw, name it they got it.
Thank you for your help.
Ginger

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Lumber to countertop

With 8/4 lumber there is a couple of ways to go as far as joining them. First cut the oak into pieces about 4 inches longer than you need. You will then need to join the sides. That is, run them through a joiner to make them flat and at 90 degrees. once this is done lay the pieces out and try to assemble them for as close a match in grain as you can.

If the are not quarter sawed try to arrange them so the grain on the end alternates direction. That is the growth rings on every other one is turning up and the rest are turning down. You should have an assemble wider and slightly longer than the finished counter top.

You can join them with either edge gluing, dowels and edge gluing, biscuits and edge gluing, or router or shaper glue joints. I prefer Titebond III glue and edge gluing wood that thick. Once assembled, glued, and clamped set aside for 24 hours. I prefer this length of time before doing and machining. You will no doubt need some help handling the slab.

Next would come smoothing the surfaces. This can be handle by a wide thickness planer, belt sander, drum sander, hand plane, or hand sander depending what you have on hand. Usually for a slab this big I rent a flooring random orbital sander.

Because you joined the sides before assembly you should now be able to cut the slab to the correct width on a table saw. Try not to have a narrow board along the edge. It is better to cut some off both sides than all off one side to accomplish this. With help and a sled you can cut one end and then the other perpendicular to th front and to the required length.

You can now chamfer the edges, rout a profile, or what ever else you want on the edges. Now comes the finish sanding, staining if desired (I like "Golden Oak" oil stain myself) and finish as desired. (I prefer "Old Masters" oil based poly, sanding with 220 grit between coat 2 and 3, and between 3 and 4.)

If you are doing a cut out for a sink do it before finishing. When finishing finish all six sides to seal out moisture. Also finish the edge of the sink cutout.

If I missed anything I'm sure someone else will jump in.
I hope that helps
Jack

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.