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bikesnrovers
Loose lath

In the corner of a bedroom we are redoing is a hole in the plaster with some loose lath, in fact it extends up from the hole about a foot - the wall gives when pushed.

I watched the video where you replace the plaster with a piece of drywall but I want to know if this will give it the strength it needs?

The plaster is very thin, maybe 1/4 to 3/8 of an inch. Is there a better way to secure the lath?

Thanks!
Tad

Re: Loose lath

There are plaster repair kits that you drill hole and apply a glue. Then put screws into the lath. let it dry and patch the holes. a much better solution and a permanet fix. I have never used this but have seen it on this old house shows. you might want to search the sight.

Re: Loose lath

The question that comes to my mind is has the lath come away from the framing and is need of reattachment or is the lath just flexing because its wood and can? If the lath has come away from the framing then screwing it to the framing is the way to go. You would go through the plaster at the stud line to attach the lath to the framing if there is no stud visible through a hole. Make sure the screw is completely through the plaster to the framing. If the stud is visible pre-drill the lath so you don't split the lath and using stainless screws screw the lath to the stud. After that stablize the plaster with the plaster repair adhesive and fill in the cosmetic problems.The adhesive Ravens53 is referring to is at www.plastermagic.com

bikesnrovers
Re: Loose lath

Here is what I am dealing with.

Pic 1 the hole in the corner:

You can see that attempts to patch were done before. In the whole you can see the lath. The plaster is only about 1/4 inch thick.

Pic #2 The lath being pressed in:

I am pressing in just one of the lath boards but I could do this to all of them. Plus the wall is "soft" above the hole.

Pic #3 the end of the line:

It is hard to see but the lath just ends. I don't think it was ever connect to anything.

Any new ideas or will plaster magic still work? I have filled holes before with Durhams rock hard but none this big.

Thanks,

Tad

bikesnrovers
Re: Loose lath

Moot point now. We are ripping out the plaster and lath and drywalling the room.

Oh, joy! Dust!

plastrr385
Re: Loose lath

Your ripping out the plaster over that little hole!!! What a waste!!!

bikesnrovers
Re: Loose lath
plastrr385 wrote:

Your ripping out the plaster over that little hole!!! What a waste!!!

If you could see the project you wouldn't say so. To fix the lath properly the plaster would have to be removed from a portion of that wall floor to ceiling, and on the perpendicular wall, too. Then there is the patch that was done sometime ago on another wall. Then there are the cracks and holes. Believe me, it is not a waste, it is doing the job right.

doitmyselfer
Re: Loose lath

I just finished ripping out a plaster and lathe ceiling in a 11 x 16 foot bedroom. On top of the tons of plaster dust there was blown insulation also. Then carrying the bags and bags of plaster chunks and debris down a flight of stairs was the icing on the cake. It had to be done though, so I feel for you!

Re: Loose lath

As long as the plaster is up it can be repaired. Anything you replace it with is designed for modern houses and not for historic houses and is nowhere as durable.

doitmyselfer
Re: Loose lath

What is the cost of repairing plaster, including missing/loose chunks, compared to installing drywall?

Re: Loose lath

The cost of every project is site specific. In general the important things to remember is that: It is almost always cheaper to repair than replace, Plaster has a much longer life span and track record than gypsum wall board, Anything you replace original plaster with will not be as durable, last as long, or have a longer track record. As long as the plaster is up its cheaper to repair. Ask any real estate agent if a house is worth more with plaster or sheetrock. That being said there is always the exception to the rule.

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