Home>Discussions>GREEN HOUSE & HOME>Living Green, What Does It Mean?
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A. Spruce
Living Green, What Does It Mean?

Living green, what does it mean? Really? Reduce, recycle, reuse, that is the mantra of the "green" set, but when you start looking at that philosophy, and the consumer products that are being created, is "green" REALLY green?

One of many products being touted as "green" is this business of rubber mulch. Why is it NOT ok to toss used tires out on the side of the road, but it's perfectly "green" to shred them, dye them with chemicals, then scatter them about the yard? A fee is charged to "dispose" of these things to prevent them from being a hazardous waste to the environment when new tires are purchased down at the shop, then they've magically become inert - by the process of shredding and dying - and totally environmentally friendly. What a joy it is to know that when you go down to Sprawl Mart to get a new set of radials, you can conveniently walk inside where they've so nicely shredded, bagged, and labeled your used tires as Premium Rubber Mulch, so that you can repurchase them and take them home to your yard for disposal.

There are so many other uses for this particular product that are more eco-friendly than allowing it to be buried in the back yards of the populace. From rubber municipal walk ways to traffic control devices (i.e., speed humps, bumps, barriers ) to curbs, parking lots, and driveways. Why is it that what would otherwise be considered toxic waste, is now being sold to consumers as a green product?

xyxoxy
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?

I always took it to mean that it's more green to shred them and put them to use instead of burning them or burying them as they used to do (and still do).

I'm really not sure how toxic the dyes are... do you know or was that just said for effect?

Not too far from where I live there was a tire dump which was used for years and years to bury used tires. One day it "accidentally" (??) caught fire and burned for weeks, spewing nastiness into the air. Had those tires instead been in my flower bed I think the negative environmental impact would have been much less.

That's my opinion for what it's worth.

Debra
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?

I think the biggest point to recycling the old tires is that they extract the "steel Belted radial part" then they reuse the rubber. That costs money to do therefore those home owners that want to use it have to pay for it. Just chopping it up has expense too but the tire fee we pay isn't really to "recycle" the tire it's to pay for the space and care of the tire until some recycler or retreader comes to haul it away.

Like the previous poster a local retreader's acreage caught fire the fire burned for weeks and created a lot of environmental problems for the small town I lived in. Plus that place didn't keep water out of the tires laying around so they had a massive mosquito problem. I hated going out there not even deet would keep them away.

ed21
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?

While I would never use rubber mulch for the reasons stated, I agree that tire dumps are a nuisance especially when they catch fire & release smoke & runoff. Illegal dumps are a blight & foster mosquitoes, something I don't need more of on the east coast in light of west nile virus and other diseases.
I guess the green part of the equation is that the rubber isn't just taking up space in a landfill for now, but being reused. Now the guy that invented speed humps should be strung up whether they are made of recycled rubber or unrecycled asphalt.:)

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?

Here's one for you. You can no longer spray used oil on gravel driveways to keep dust down but you can have an asphalt drive installed and the locale, state, and federal government spreads miles and miles of asphalt.
Jack

djohns
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

. You can no longer spray used oil on gravel driveways to keep dust down

You can if you don't get caught . :cool:

But I understand where you'r coming from .

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?
djohns wrote:

You can if you don't get caught . :cool:

But I understand where you'r coming from .

Apparently we've been to the same place.:cool:
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?

Tires are not being burned as a means disposal. My comments are to compare apples for apples in whether a whole tire is left laying beside the road or any other location, and how that is any different to the environment than the shredded form. IMHO, having large items, such as stepping stones or sidewalk panels or speed humps is a much better use of the material because it's allows for removal and recycling again, as opposed to using it as mulch that will be spread in tiny bits over a broader area, having a larger environmental impact.

Don't get me wrong, there's plenty of good things that make good use of used tires. Track and field tracks are made of it, rubber fatigue mats are made from it, and there are several cities testing sidewalk panels. Here in my own city I recently saw a speed hump that looked to be made of it. I just don't see how getting homeowners to bury little bits all over their yards is a good thing.

canuk
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?
Quote:

I just don't see how getting homeowners to bury little bits all over their yards is a good thing.

I'm with you there.:confused::cool:

Debra
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?

Okay, I agree about the shredded bits being tracked all over the place, but any other mulch and even decorative rock pose the same problem. I think the idea is to use them properly, keeping them contained with a box as well as putting in a proper barrier beneath them. lol but little kids will track things everywhere, at least mine do. I have more sand on the patio than in the sand pit.

I like the idea of using them as speed humps. We could use a few around here. I don't have any trouble with them but my truck has ample clearance, If I were in my mother's Neon regularly that would be a different story.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Living Green, What Does It Mean?
A. Spruce wrote:

My comments are to compare apples for apples in whether a whole tire is left laying beside the road or any other location, and how that is any different to the environment than the shredded form..

One big difference is that whole tires catch water inside that sits stagnate and provides a breading place for mosquitoes. That's why they have to be shredded.
Jack

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