Home>Discussions>ELECTRICAL & LIGHTING>light fixture 90 degree rated?
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Dom G
light fixture 90 degree rated?

we recently bought 3 light fixtures to install. Nothing fancy. 2 bulbbs, 60 watt max each, low profile. The fixture had a warning saying to consult a qualified electrician because the supply wires should be rated 90 degree celcuis max and most housees built before 1985 are rated for 60 degree max. Our house was built in the 1950s. I think that much of the electrical in the house was updated by a previous owner. I plan on using CFL bulbs. I asked 2 electricians I know and they said not to worry about it.

bp21901
Re: light fixture 90 degree rated?

Insulation on the newer wire is rated for the higher temperature. Do you have access to the supply wire for the light fixtures - maybe in an attic space? If so, you could install a junction box and use new 90* rated wire from the junction box to the light fixture. The J-box should not be buried in a wall, it needs to be accessible when you are done, that is why I asked about attic access.

kentvw
Re: light fixture 90 degree rated?

You will see that label or tag on virtually every wall or ceiling mount light fixture sold today.

Would it be better to have 90 degree wire to feed the fixture? Probably.

But here’s my take. There was a reason the NEC went with the 90 degree requirement and it was probably because some or a few houses burned down because fixtures or the wire feeding them caused the fire.

I won’t tell you what to do but if it was my house and the fixture was properly installed with the insulation that came with it and the correct lamp installed I would not lose one minute of sleep over it.

Although, I would advise you to take a look at the info on your CF bulb and see if it is rated to be installed in an enclosed fixture. (If that is what you have.) Most CF’s I have seen are not. Also check on what positions the bulb can be installed.

Dom G
Re: light fixture 90 degree rated?

Thanks for the reply. The glass dome does not completely enclose the fixture there is a 1/2 inch space around the perimiter of the dome. Do you think it's OK to use the cfl bulbs?

Dom

kentvw
Re: light fixture 90 degree rated?

I would think that as long as there is air circulation it is not an "enclosed" lighting fixture.

In all honesty I do not understand all of the limitations for CF lamps. They do not burn near as hot as a standard bulb even with the little built in ballast and I really do not understand why in the world there would be limitations, on some of them at least, on the postion they can be installed.

Being the wild and crazy guy that I am I have ignored all of the rules and have them installed in all kinds of fixture types. :D

I have discovered no ill effects to date.

Ernie_Fergler
Re: light fixture 90 degree rated?
kentvw wrote:

You will see that label or tag on virtually every wall or ceiling mount light fixture sold today.

Would it be better to have 90 degree wire to feed the fixture? Probably.

But here’s my take. There was a reason the NEC went with the 90 degree requirement and it was probably because some or a few houses burned down because fixtures or the wire feeding them caused the fire.

I won’t tell you what to do but if it was my house and the fixture was properly installed with the insulation that came with it and the correct lamp installed I would not lose one minute of sleep over it.

Although, I would advise you to take a look at the info on your CF bulb and see if it is rated to be installed in an enclosed fixture. (If that is what you have.) Most CF’s I have seen are not. Also check on what positions the bulb can be installed.

I agree 100%
The only thing I can add would be newer Romex will have a "B" in the print description on the sheathing.
But Romex or Romex "B" should never be a worry.....

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