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kaosmax4u
Leaky Faucet
kaosmax4u

So, i thought it would be just a simple replace the washer scenario. The brass is so old, the handle has a setscrew and then it unscrews, then there's a cap with the threads destroyed then a porcelain skirt and finally a packing nut and below that a pull out the valve core nut. So i unscrew the valve core nut, pop out the valve, replace the washer (almost down to the metal here and the washer needs a little sanding to fit) and pop the core back in BUT after tightning, the valve just spins freely with nothing happening.

Well, it turns out that the valve screws into a floating seat and i don't know how to secure it. I've done this type before and got away with it through blind luck i guess.

Any ideas?

dj1
Re: Leaky Faucet
dj1

Sounds like your faucet is ready for the dump. New faucets are not that expensive you know. They are also very easy to install.

kaosmax4u
Re: Leaky Faucet
kaosmax4u
dj1 wrote:

Sounds like your faucet is ready for the dump. New faucets are not that expensive you know. They are also very easy to install.

Maybe YOU are ready for the dump ... have you heard of restoration ? Good faucets are expensive and i was looking for some expertise to rescue this old classic setup.

Regards,

Max ^_~

dj1
Re: Leaky Faucet
dj1

Max relax, you won't get much help with YOUR attitude.

Good faucets are NOT expensive. Running all over town looking for a washer IS expensive.

A. Spruce
Re: Leaky Faucet
A. Spruce

Take the parts to a dealer that specializes in old faucets and fixtures OR call a plumber.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Leaky Faucet
HoustonRemodeler

Take pictures and post on the Terry Love Plumbing Forum.

Generally we replace older faucets as plumbers charge $150 per hour to chase down those parts.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Leaky Faucet
Mastercarpentry

If it was manufactured then it can be repaired, but the question is always whether it's worth it.

I just tossed out an industrial-grade faucet because it's stem insert had loosened so that turning the valve didn't close the washer; it just spun around and around. The original part was 'shrunk-fit' when it was made by heating the body then dropping in a cold threaded insert. I know this because it was made locally and I have friends at the plant. I could have tried epoxy and it would have likely worked. I would have sent it back with one of my friends but the model was discontinued long ago and they have switched to a fully machined design instead of the shrink-fit one. Rather than going through all the hassle I simply replaced it. Unless you're doing a historical restoration that's what I'd recommend for you. If it is historical then seek out a similar old restorable faucet and expect to pay through the nose for it plus the restoration costs.

Life is too short to use it up trying to save things you're better off dumping!

Phil

ed21
Re: Leaky Faucet
ed21

I never came across a valve with a floating seat.
Either you didn't put it back correctly or the part is worn out. I'm guessing the part was pressed fit into place.
How about a little epoxy to hold it tight.
I don't disagree with the previous replace it posts.

kaosmax4u
Re: Leaky Faucet
kaosmax4u

To junk or not to junk that is the question ... haha - well a spacer washer had disintegrated and that's all it took (haha, after 88 years that won't be much left of me) . I found a reasonable facsimile and filed the diameter down to size. All good now.

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