Home>Discussions>INTERIORS>Living Areas & Workspaces>Leaking where basement wall & floor meet
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coblas
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet

Yup! I agree. I'm waiting for an answer to an email.

LeonardHomes
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet
coblas wrote:

When there is a heavy rain or massive thawing, my basement floods with water entering where the wall and floor meet. The gutters seem to be fine. (I ran water through the downspouts which tie in to drain tile originally installed outside around the foundation, and water exited at the ends of the pipes.) Would hydraulic cement or epoxy around the inside perimeter (maybe after chiseling out a "V") solve the problem? There's no sump pump.

I would recommend the first thing to address is getting the down spouts out of the weeping tiles. Deeping on what type of weeping drain pipes are in place , that exceesive amount of water coming from the down spouts would over whelm the the drains. In some older homes clay or cast pipes were laid along the perimeter footings. Each section of pipe had about a 1/4 inch or 1/8 inch gap from the adjoining pipe. This allowed the water to enter from the soil.
Over time , especially the clay pipe they would crack or break and allowing the downspouts to empty into these would spill huge amount of unwanted water down along the foundation. Also with the excess water from the downspouts can force water out of the gaps intended for inlets.

coblas
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet

Interesting comments. I know the perimeter drain tile is plastic, having had the house built (in 1970), and the perforations in the pipe face downward. I believe it was installed properly (location, gravel, straw, slope, etc.), although, at this point, it probably doesn't matter. Professional advice at the time was that a sump pump wasn't necessary. Gutters and extending the pipes came 15 or so years later as attempts to solve the flooding problem. (See my comment from 12/21/10.) Prior to that, the lowest pipe exited from the footings to the front into an underground dry well (french drain) 30-40' down the slope, but my thinking was that the flooding indicated it couldn't handle it. My best guess at this point is that the drain tile is damaged, partly because the flooding didn't always occur in the front, but does now. Hard to know if the gutter downspouts are contributing to the problem, especially since they were added years later with the intention of stopping the floods. They do drain freely to the outlets.

coblas
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet

Here's an update: Since my last post, I've spoken with Xypex tech support, the local Xypex sales rep., 3 contractors who work with the stuff, and 10 references. I've chosen the contractor who makes the most sense. He'll be starting work in a week or two. Parts of his plan aren't according to spec and they sound like overkill, which I consider a plus! I've moved everything and scrubbed the areas where he'll work, so he's good to go. (I also spoke with an excellent contractor who takes the trench/pipe/gravel/sump pump approach. I consider that a last resort.) Thank you so much, Hank, for your suggestion to look into Xypex. I'm cautiously optimistic and will let you know how it works out.

coblas
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet

The Xypex application was completed today. My assignment for the next 3 days is to moisten the treated areas with a light spritz of water twice a day to slow the drying and encourage the crystallization process. The Xypex should be fully cured in about 30 days. The next major thaw or torrential rain will reveal how successful this project has been. Keep your fingers crossed!!

morsesdjserv
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet

how did xypex work for you r u dry ?

Sten
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet
coblas wrote:

Interesting comments. I know the perimeter drain tile is plastic, having had the house built (in 1970), and the perforations in the pipe face downward. I believe it was installed properly (location, gravel, straw, slope, etc.), although, at this point, it probably doesn't matter. Professional advice at the time was that a sump pump wasn't necessary. Gutters and extending the pipes came 15 or so years later as attempts to solve the flooding problem. (See my comment from 12/21/10.) Prior to that, the lowest pipe exited from the footings to the front into an underground dry well (french drain) 30-40' down the slope, but my thinking was that the flooding indicated it couldn't handle it. My best guess at this point is that the drain tile is damaged, partly because the flooding didn't always occur in the front, but does now. Hard to know if the gutter downspouts are contributing to the problem, especially since they were added years later with the intention of stopping the floods. They do drain freely to the outlets.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong but aren't the perforations or holes in his pipe supposed to be up and not facing down?? If they face down they won't catch the water, if they face up the water rises and enters the pipe through the holes and drains down the solid or bottom of the pipe. Sounds like his drain pipe may be installed wrong.

coblas
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet
Sten wrote:

Someone correct me if I'm wrong but aren't the perforations or holes in his pipe supposed to be up and not facing down?? If they face down they won't catch the water, if they face up the water rises and enters the pipe through the holes and drains down the solid or bottom of the pipe. Sounds like his drain pipe may be installed wrong.

I'm not absolutely certain of which way the drain tile was installed, although I recall something about straw being placed on top of it, so you may be right. Flooding wasn't a problem at first, but progressed over time. Investigating the pipe isn't an option anyway since so much of it runs under the house (front back to front), or I would have gone that route.

I had a flood in my basement on March 14th, but it didn't come through the Xypex. It had been applied 18" up the wall and water didn't come in above it either. My impression is that the Xypex redirected the water more than anticipated and possibly downward--some seemed to have come up through the floor and it hadn't done that in the past. The contractor came back and said flooding had never happened before in the 7 years he had been working with Xypex. He applied more all around the basement and in a few areas where he hadn't and now I have to wait for flooding conditions again. I keep checking to make sure I can see exactly where it's coming from. Meanwhile, I'm considering my options. Stay tuned...

coblas
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet

Here's an update. There were substantial downpours intermittently yesterday and the day before, but the basement has remained dry. While the rain didn't compare to the enormous volume of water from massive snow thawing in the past (and subsequent flooding), it's certainly encouraging.

coblas
Re: Leaking where basement wall & floor meet

Had a major downpour April 26-27, which brought considerable flooding, although not as bad as in March. Before it occurred, I had made a floor plan of the treated areas and was able to mark where the water came in over the 2-day period. I noticed quite a bit of the Xypex had chipped off where it overlapped onto the floor and water seeped in under it. I called Xypex headquarters and was told there would only be chipping if the Xypex hadn't cured long enough (10-14 days, which wasn't the case in my situation) or the surface had not been roughed up enough to allow the crystallization process to occur properly. I also was told that all of the chipped Xypex had to be removed and the surface roughed up more or holes drilled into the floor perimeter, before reapplication. I removed what loose Xypex I could (with a wrist problem) and collected a substantial boxful.

When the contractor came, he said, as he had before, that he didn't know why the flooding occurred, so I told him I knew that and had contacted Xypex headquarters to see if they might know. I told him what they had told me and he was livid and defensive, and said the surface was rough enough and he would not drill. He had other drainage suggestions, all of which would have lined his pockets, but were not logical (not installed at the low spots, for example). He had his worker apply more Xypex around the perimeter without removing any more of the chipping Xypex, but not in the stairwell or other difficult to reach places, where there had been profuse leaking and he hadn't roughened the floor to begin with. I contacted the sales rep who came over later. He said I might have gotten a bad job. I'm waiting for another prolonged downpour to see if the last treatment the contractor applied took care of the problem. The rep promised to help me work this out and asked me to call him next time there's seepage. (Most likely, this will happen in the middle of the night on a holiday weekend.)

Believe it or not, this is a summary of what actually occurred. My impression is that the contractor is a typical homeowner's nightmare. I can only hope that when there's more (inevitable) seepage, the rep will be able to help me solve the problem. Not only is the contractor unlikely to be willing to come back, but I really don't want him in my house.

Unfortunately, I can't really evaluate Xypex at this point. It's probably fine and the application is only as good as the contractor, who was supposed to be wonderful. Maybe I've at least said something here that will help someone else.

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