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Brian
leading the downspout into the ground

We had a leak in the foundation with all this rain and want to now divert the downspout near the crack further away from the house ( at the recommendation of the crack leak fixer). The problem is that the downspout now comes down to an area that is about 4 feet level and then drops down to a steep downslope of about another 6 feet...so steep the riding mower can't be used there with out falling off. The concrete guy said to get some 4 inch round tubing? from a store and divert the downspout from the gutter into the ground about 4-5 feet away from where it currently is. Pretty easy so far. Now my wife says to get the tube with slits in it so the water leaks out of it slowly along the slope but the other guy didn't say anything about that. They sell both so I am not sure which to get. I thought the one with slits would just put the water back in the ground close to the house.
Any thoughts?

canuk
Re: leading the downspout into the ground
bfarrell wrote:

We had a leak in the foundation with all this rain and want to now divert the downspout near the crack further away from the house ( at the recommendation of the crack leak fixer). The problem is that the downspout now comes down to an area that is about 4 feet level and then drops down to a steep downslope of about another 6 feet...so steep the riding mower can't be used there with out falling off. The concrete guy said to get some 4 inch round tubing? from a store and divert the downspout from the gutter into the ground about 4-5 feet away from where it currently is. Pretty easy so far. Now my wife says to get the tube with slits in it so the water leaks out of it slowly along the slope but the other guy didn't say anything about that. They sell both so I am not sure which to get. I thought the one with slits would just put the water back in the ground close to the house.
Any thoughts?

Exactly correct,
The objective is to drain the excess water away from the foundation.
Get drainage pipe without the *weeping* holes -- common ABS or PVC waste pipe found in the plumbing section of home centers is perfectly fine to use as well.

Brian
Re: leading the downspout into the ground

is it ok to have just end in the ground. We don't want it to come out of the side of the hill as it might erode away the ground below it on the downslope and the neighbors yard is right there.

Dobbs
Re: leading the downspout into the ground

I agree with canuk; however. this project would be more pleasant-appearing and effective if you followed some of the standard methods of burying the drainpipe additions, with the addition of a small catch basin sub-grade just below ground level right after the downspout.

A catch basin can be made from one of those 5 gallon red plastic gas cans sold at the discount stores; a 4" round hole is cut to accept the downspout elbow; another 4" round hole is cut at the top to install a cleanout; & a 3rd 4" round hole is cut to extend the drain away from the foundation.

You can then cut into the little hill & make a right angle on the little hill & bury a 12' section of 4" perforated drain pipe that will distribute the runoff---the perforated section is first covered with landscape fabric, or a fabric "boot" that is slipped over the perforated pipe to keep silt out & then surrounded by pea stone/gravel to improve draining.

The purpose of the catch basin is to catch the dirt, shingle granules & leaves so they don't clog up the perforated section.

Some people add a drywell (which is often just a hole filled with rocks/broken concrete/bricks) at the end of the perforated section to allow greater water capacity & drainage.

The perforated piping & small dry well should be a good distance from the foundation, at least 10 feet, if possible.

The plastic pipe used for these projects is availabe at HD/Lowes & is approx 1/8" thick (Schedule 30 or Schedule 40) much thinner (and less expensive) than the thicker diameter pipe (Schedule 20) used for indoor plumbing purposes---flexible black corrugated pipe is sometimes used, but I prefer the white Schedule 30/40.

The small trench you dug is then back-filled with the soil you removed & the surface re-seeded with a small package of spot area grass seed used for this purpose.

There are numerous sites on the web with photos that cover this project----Google "diy residential downspout catch basin dry well" (without the quotes), to get more info.

dj1
Re: leading the downspout into the ground

I agree with the above suggestions, but let me add this:
If your house is elevated compared to the street, and you live in an area that gets a lot of rain, it would be smart to continue the 4" buried drain pipe under the sidewalk and through the curb (requires cutting the curb) to the street. Use ABS solid pipe, ABS cement between sections (so no roots can come in) and make sure you have enough slope to the street. This way, even if you get 100 inches of rain, the water will be taken away from your property. Just remember to maintain this drain, so the water can flow freely.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: leading the downspout into the ground

Depending on your local code SDR35 (green colored) 4 inch solid (NO holes) pipe can be used. Its thinner and cheaper than the thicker traditional plumbing pipes and fittings, plus the fittings are cheaper and designed for landscape drainage. When adding more pipe to pipe, its best to place the 'bell' end up hill, so the water cascades over the lip of the uphill section of pipe. Also run the pipe 18" or so up the side of the house so that landscape debris doesn't fall into the pipe.

Brian
Re: leading the downspout into the ground

***....thanks for the help! didn't think I would get that indepth directions on how to fix this aqua problem. I am working on it right now.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: leading the downspout into the ground

Whatever you do - don't use the corrugated flex pipe with the slits in it. That stuff will clog with roots in no time as the plants find it as an easy source of water. Use the SDR35 pipe pitching it down hill to the street. The idea being once the water enters the pipe the only place it has to leave the pipe is at the street.

Brian
Re: leading the downspout into the ground

ok got it with the pipe....now I have to do the same around the shed except that is not on a hill. For that I am going to use the slitted pipe with a sleeve over it and lead that away from the structure.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: leading the downspout into the ground

For the shed on level ground use the same pipe and techniques:

bring the 4"SDR35 pipe up the side ot the building 18 inches or so. Don't have the opening at ground level. The 18" will allow you to develop head pressure in the pipe, pushing the water horizontally for quite a distance. Any water that gets into the pipe leaves the pipe. The smooth sides allows any standing debris to to ejected next time it rains.

My home in Houston sets on a lot 120 feet deep with less than 4" of natural slope to the ground. I have the same system here and it works beautifully with no clogs.

Brian
Re: leading the downspout into the ground

houston....I don't know where elso to leave the opening if not at ground level. If I have to bury it I will have to dig real deep to get a slope on the pipe. The exit is the problem. I was going to get one of those endings that have a 90 degree elbow and then a cap with a flow top on it that will open when water pushes on it. Do you think this will work?

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