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ccarol
laundry room circuit

Before installing a ceiling in my laundry room would like to install a dedicated outlet for my washer/gas dryer. need to know what gauge wire to use & amp/voltage of outlet? Will be using a pro to hook up to the panel, just trying to save a few $ by doing some prep my self.

Gizmo
Re: laundry room circuit

12 gauge wire,120 volt 20 amp receptacle, 20-amp breaker.

I have my washer & dryer on its own 20 amp breakers.

Im sure one of our electrician members will chime in also.
There then real pro's

Re: laundry room circuit

Carol, I believe like Gizmo it will probably be a 120V 20A GFCI protected receptacle and require 12-2 w/ ground Romex wire but, before you close in the room you should check the manufacturers nameplate/installation manual.

I assume you don't live in a jurisdiction that requires conduit in a home.

Good Luck from Wilsonville, Alabama
Maurice Turgeon, http://thesemi-retiredelectrician

Gizmo
Re: laundry room circuit
The Semi-Retired Electric wrote:

Carol, I believe like Gizmo it will probably be a 120V 20A GFCI protected receptacle

Good Luck from Wilsonville, Alabama
Maurice Turgeon, http://thesemi-retiredelectrician

Hmmmm cant say Ive ever seen GFCI protection for W/D appliances.

The recips trip when the wind blows.....
Oh well Maurice is the Pro Electrician.....follow his suggestons.

good luck

Edgeking
Re: laundry room circuit

Maurice, i know there needs to be a laundry recptacle that is dedicated to the washer, however i cannot find where it needs to be gfci protected unless it is within 6' of the outside edge of the sink? Carol, good luck and be safe. Greg

Re: laundry room circuit

Guys, I agree if there is no sink edge within six feet of the receptacle Art. 210.8 will not apply and a GFCI would not be required, unless the local AHJ calls it a wet location. If it was my house I would install a GFCI. And is why I said the electrician would "probably" use one.

I recently installed an AFCI breaker (as required) in a sun room and because I knew the owner would have a lot of plants, an inside hose connection and a sloping floor w/ a drain I installed GFCI protection w/ in-use covers every 6/12 ft. The inspector said they were not required in front of the client and I responded that I was giving them to my friend, free of charge.

The trend in household wiring is: if the 120V 15A & 20A branch circuits don't have GFCI protection they require AFCI's. And, I can see the day where every circuit will be a combination AFCI/GFCI that provides personnel protection.

Good Luck from Wilsonville, Alabama
Maurice Turgeon, http://thesemi-retiredelectrician

Edgeking

I totally agree that a gfci would be the best device to use, and i would use one myself, and if the homeowner is trying to save money by doing some of the work herself i would not save it by not buying a gfci. i was just going on the technical question. However, Carol, when roughing in a laundry room keep in mind that the plug has to be within 6' of the applience. thanks

Also i totally agree that the gfis and the in use covers were the best thing to install on the house, that is a nice touch

Re: laundry room circuit

Edgeking, since no mention was made of a sink you were absolutely correct to mention no GFCI was required. And if I were bidding a 300 home subdivision I would not include one, without an upsell.

I wonder why the Code makers don't consider the edge of a washing machine cover the same as a sink not to mention the water hose connections and in this case the possibility of a ground fault on a natural gas appliance.

Good Luck from Wilsonville, Alabama
Maurice Turgeon, http://thesemi-retiredelectrician

Edgeking
Re: laundry room circuit

I agree im sure everyone has seen a hose rupture, or seen an arc when unplugging a device under a load. I totally agree with the gfi and the afci code requirements. i do hate however telling poeple, espically older folks on fixed incomes something will cost more because of code. i would like to tell Carol again dont save money by skimping on safety.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: laundry room circuit

Considering the fact that both the washer and dryer have capacitive start motors, I would not install GFCI receptacles. Code specifically states that the laundry equipment circuit may not be used for other outlets. Another point, while it is not stated in residential code sec 550.13(B) specifically excepts laundry outlet form GFCI in mobile homes.

One other thought ccarol might consider, while the ceiling is open and you have easy access is to run a 10-3 30 amp circuit and install a receptacle for an electric dryer. That way you will have it available if you replace the current dryer.

Jack

Re: laundry room circuit

Jack I think we all agree a GFCI is not required for the washer but receptacles within 6 ft of a sinks edge do need GFCI protection, which could pose a problem if a washer were placed close to a sink and the standard receptacle location was not carefully thought out.

Your comment about capacitive start motor got me wondering if you've seen or heard these are a problem on GFCI circuits and it's something I should consider, in the future.

Installing a a future 10-3 circuit is a smart move.

Good Luck from Wilsonville, Alabama
Maurice Turgeon, http://thesemi-retiredelectrician

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