20 posts / 0 new
Last post
Pdub
Re: Laundry Drain

I wish I could upload a photo for you, but this site sucks when it comes to that.
Here are all the details.
This is a front load washer, I have a grey hose coming from the back of the washer to a box in the wall, in that box are my water connection and a drain line where I put the hose from the washer, it is that hole where I put the grey hose, the smell is coming from the hole in the box that my grey hose goes to

This is the best link I can get in here:
http://www.thegoodguys.com.au/buy******/Samsung_7.5kg_Front_Load_Washer_WF1752WPW
if you look at the back of the washer that is the grey hose I’m referring to, if I put my nose up to the wall drain that is where the smell is coming from.
I hate to pull out the washer and tear into the wall to see what the plumbers forgot but it looks like that may have to happen.
If I do tear into the wall how should it look?
I stuffer a rag around the hoses on the drain to help block the smell but that was not successful.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Laundry Drain

That would be a temporary fix at best.

Head on over to the Terry Love Plumbing Forum where you can post pictures on your new thread.

Pdub
Re: Laundry Drain

Thanks all;
With all your ideas I figured it out.
The smell was from the gases coming from the floor drain and not the wall drain for the washer line.
I went to the local plumbing store and they sell an item that you can put on your drain that will allow water to go in but does not allow air back out which blocks the gas smell from coming back out into the house.
Thanks again for all your help

ed21
Re: Laundry Drain

Floor drains usually/should have traps. If the drain isn't used much the water in the trap can dry out and allow sewer gases in the house. Pour some water down the drain on a regular basis to keep the trap full of water.
Codes in commercial building usually require a trap primer that will put water in the trap when a nearby fixture, usually a toilet, is used.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Laundry Drain
Pdub wrote:

Thanks all;
With all your ideas I figured it out.
The smell was from the gases coming from the floor drain and not the wall drain for the washer line.
I went to the local plumbing store and they sell an item that you can put on your drain that will allow water to go in but does not allow air back out which blocks the gas smell from coming back out into the house.
Thanks again for all your help

I believe these are called "Dry Traps". The one's I've seen have a hollow ball that fits over a hole. Water floats the ball and drains, then the ball ceases to float afterward thus sealing when it reseats. These are a good idea on seldom-used floor drains.

Phil

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Laundry Drain

you might be missing the trap below the valve box, before the main stack

do a google image search for "clothes washer drain plumbing"

johnjh2o
Re: Laundry Drain
Pdub wrote:

Thanks all;
With all your ideas I figured it out.
The smell was from the gases coming from the floor drain and not the wall drain for the washer line.
I went to the local plumbing store and they sell an item that you can put on your drain that will allow water to go in but does not allow air back out which blocks the gas smell from coming back out into the house.
Thanks again for all your help

If the smell is coming from the floor drain then just adding water to the trap will solve your problem. To prevent it from drying out again put a cup of vegetable water in the drain. The oil won't evaporate like the water will.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Laundry Drain

John.

I'm sure you meant vegetable oil, not vegetable water. Whatever that stuff is.

Pages

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.