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MassGuy25
Ladder tall enough to get on roof?
MassGuy25

Hey guys,

I recently bought a fixer-upper. I am trying to find a way to replace some of the wood that is rotten. The wood that is rotten are the outside rafters. A normal ladder that you would lean against the roof won't work. This is due to the fact that where you would "lean it against" the wood is rotten. I was thinking of using a step ladder that is tall enough. This way, I don't need to lean it against anything.

The roof is 15 feet off the ground. Can anyone offer any advice?

Clarence
Re: Ladder tall enough to get on roof?
Clarence

Rent or purchase 4 each scaffold frames 6'6" X 5'.
Cross braces 4 each.
Walk Boards 4 each
leveling jacks 4 each
This will give you a work platform of 30 sq/ft
total height 14 ft. plus adjustment at screw jacks.
Put platform @ 8 ft. and you have fall protecting.
Rent cost $ 200.00 mo.
Purchase $ 600.00 you own it keep or sell at completion Sell for 4 300.00

MassGuy25
Re: Ladder tall enough to get on roof?
MassGuy25
Clarence wrote:

Rent or purchase 4 each scaffold frames 6'6" X 5'.
Cross braces 4 each.
Walk Boards 4 each
leveling jacks 4 each
This will give you a work platform of 30 sq/ft
total height 14 ft. plus adjustment at screw jacks.
Put platform @ 8 ft. and you have fall protecting.
Rent cost $ 200.00 mo.
Purchase $ 600.00 you own it keep or sell at completion Sell for 4 300.00

Do you think something like this:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_159201-46486-I-CISC_1z0wcfp__?productId=3930243&pl=1

Would work?

ed21
Re: Ladder tall enough to get on roof?
ed21

Ladder extensions should keep the ladder off the fascia. If you are replacing a lot two ladders may be needed for a helper. Renting scaffolding as Clarence said sounds like a safer and easier way to go.
In general I don't like using step ladders outside. It can be difficult to get it level, may have to deal with soft ground and it can be too easy for them to fall with a less than perfect base.
http://www.lowes.com/Tools/Ladders-Scaffolding/Ladder-Scaffolding-Accessories/_/N-1z0wcfn/pl#!

A. Spruce
Re: Ladder tall enough to get on roof?
A. Spruce

Replacing fascia/barge rafters isn't much fun, and really requires a helper. You can do it safely from extension ladders, preferably with stand-offs, or go with scaffolding or a boom lift. What you use will be determined by the amount of space you have. With any ladder, make sure that it is firmly footed, whether you have to shim the feet or not.

Clarence
Re: Ladder tall enough to get on roof?
Clarence
MassGuy25 wrote:

Do you think something like this:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_159201-46486-I-CISC_1z0wcfp__?productId=3930243&pl=1

Would work?

Not good for outside work and if you stack them you need out riggers go with the frame type.

dj1
Re: Ladder tall enough to get on roof?
dj1

For your own safety, do not use a step ladder outdoor and this high. Too many things can go wrong.

Dobbs
Re: Ladder tall enough to get on roof?
Dobbs

I've had good luck simply going to HD/Lowe's & buying 2X6 or 2X8 lengths of framing lumber verticals & bolting them together with horizontal cross-pieces of the same lumber & the same lumber for a horizontal walk-way at the height you'll be working at.

Framing lumber is sturdy & low-cost.

Firmly attach the wood scaffolding securely to the building at several points, especially near the top.

When the job is done you can use the "scaffolding" lumber for other purposes.

I was able to shingle an entire roof at twice the height you'll be working at & had ZERO problems over several weeks of work.

http://www.doityourself.com/stry/building-homemade-scaffolding
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDBiLc38pmQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qe47efswhTw

Mastercarpentry
Re: Ladder tall enough to get on roof?
Mastercarpentry

Not being facetious or demeaning here, but if you have to ask then you are better off with scaffolding than a ladder of any type, and that should not be the 'Baker" style you linked to. It is too narrow to be stable when stacked unless there's a very solid, flat, and level floor underneath it. It is not meant to be used on any other kind of surface even when tied off.

Best is what Clarence suggests, but you can stack planking, plywood, or solid concrete block under the legs instead of using levelers. You can sometimes find good deals on this kind of scaffolding on Craigslist, but avoid any that is bent or heavily dented and test-fit the sections together before parting with your cash as a lot of this got abused when taken down- it's never to be dropped or thrown but lowered gently instead. I've worked 6 floors up on this stuff and it's the best there is.

I work with ladders a lot, and when set up and used correctly they can be very safe but how to do that is not easily explained nor is there one way that always works. Plus there are other factors involved- some of that is empirical judgement that only experience can teach. And stepladders are the worst of all when it comes to safety.

You can't DIY very well when you're leg is in a cast so be safe and use the right things for whatever job you do.
Phil

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