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canuk
Re: KVAR units

Arrrrgh ... man .... all these complicated restrictions and regulations .... it's a simple pot of coffee .... can't it be just that .... simple?

havanagranite
Re: KVAR units
canuk wrote:

Arrrrgh ... man .... all these complicated restrictions and regulations .... it's a simple pot of coffee .... can't it be just that .... simple?

not a chance you came to the wrong board for that. and just for that we will do some r & d to see how we might make it more complicated and try to pull some strings with UL to see if we can't tighten up restrictions on coffee pots

:eek:

JLMCDANIEL
Re: KVAR units
canuk wrote:

Arrrrgh ... man .... all these complicated restrictions and regulations .... it's a simple pot of coffee .... can't it be just that .... simple?

No that's why god gave us Starbucks.
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: KVAR units
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

No that's why god gave us Starbucks.
Jack

Yeah, best not let DIY'ers make coffee, you know how hazardous that can be! Remember the woman who had to sue McDonalds because they didn't tell her that the coffee may be hot and not to take the lid off and place open cup between her legs while driving? What was McDonald's thinking, anyway?

awaygood
Re: KVAR units

As an electrical engineer, I can confirm that any company which suggests that residential consumers can save money through power factor improvement ('kvar' unit!) is talking absolute nonsense, and shows a complete lack of understanding of what power factor improvement is all about.

Residential premises are charged on the energy consumption (watt hours). Power factor improvement has absolutely no effect on energy consumption. It also has absolutely no effect on the 'efficiency' of any motors you may be using. Power factor improvement may reduce the amount of load current you draw from the supplier -but you don't pay for current, you pay for energy!

Power factor improvement makes sense for commercial/industrial consumers, because they are charged for demand as well as energy consumption. But residential consumers are only charged for energy consumption.

As far as any video on 'YouTube' is concerned, if it shows an ammeter indicating a lower current when the power-factor correction 'unit' is attached, it means nothing. The only meter that matters in such a demonstration would be a wattmeter. Of course, they won't show a wattmeter, because it will read the save value before and after installing the power-factor correction unit.

meternerd
Re: KVAR units
RSCH wrote:

Does anyone know anything about the KVAR units. They are supposed to save energy. I've found web sites that talk about and sell them.
I have a neighbor that just installed one. Hopefully I will soon see if they really work.
They appear to have some type of whole house surge protection but I can't really tell what. I'm about to install a whole house surge protector and don't want to duplicate and/or interfere with the whole house surge protector if I do install a KVAR unit.
If anyone has any information please let me know.

Thanks,

RSCH

I'm a meter tech for the local electric utility and have over 35 years in the utility industry. Here's the stratight story.....residential and most small commercial customers are charged for KWH only. The meters we use are tested at unity power factor and at 50% power factor. They must register +/- 100.5% accurate at both power factors. That said, any change in power factor (i.e. KVAR reduction) will have absolutely no effect on a residential bill. For larger commercial customers, we bill for demand and KVARh. In those cases, reduction of reactive power WILL have an effect, and in fact, we require the customer to apply power factor correction. So....save your money. If these devices actually did cause your bill to go down, it means your utility is ripping you off.

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