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dj1
Re: Kitchen Sink - Help!

I bet your strainer gave due to corrosion, but whatever the reason, it ought to be replaced. No need to replace the whole sink.

A new strainer is less than 5 bucks. You need some basic plumbing skills and some hand tools. Install it with plumber's putty. Good luck.

4thjet
Re: Kitchen Sink - Help!
dj1 wrote:

I bet your strainer gave due to corrosion, but whatever the reason, it ought to be replaced. No need to replace the whole sink.

A new strainer is less than 5 bucks. You need some basic plumbing skills and some hand tools. Install it with plumber's putty. Good luck.

Thanks for the advice DJ.
Glad I finally made it clear what happened and what the part was! :)

keith3267
Re: Kitchen Sink - Help!

Now I see the problem. I got confused when you mentioned seeing these at Walmart, you won't see what you need there. The whole drain unit is called the strainer, the part that acts as the plug and actually does the straining is the basket. I am including a link that I think shows the best picture that I can find, this is not a recommendation.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=100007083&storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&MERCH=REC%2d%5f%2dproduct%2d4%2d%5f%2d202551011%2d%5f%2d100007083%2d%5f%2dN#.UIF74t3X5e4

These come in different sizes so be sure to measure your current strainer before you buy a replacement. You can see in this one that there are actually two cup shaped bottoms, one fits inside the other and they screw together using the integrated nut on the outer cup. You separate the two pieces.

Get some plumbers putty, take about a 1" ball and roll it between your hands until it forms a rope about 1/4" think and long enough to go all the way around the lip of the inner cup and overlap a little. You may need to adjust the size of the ball you start with to get this right, and it will probably take a few attempts to get it right, only the pros get it right the first time.

Then drop the inner cup into the hole at the bottom of the sink. From under the sink, place the rubber gasket on top of the outer cup and slid it up under the inner cup and start screwing to the inner cup. Tighten down securely. You should see the plumbers putty squeezing out from around the inner cup into the sink basin. When it is tight, you just sc**** the excess plumbers putty away. Then attach the rest of the drain pipes.

4thjet
Re: Kitchen Sink - Help!

Thanks for the picture and play by play keith!

Yes that is the whole part that came out. The ones pictured are obviously for a better grade of sink than I have, but yes it's the part I was talking about.
I did see in one of the plumbing videos Tom do what you are talking about with the putty....amazing how they make it look so simple eh?

In the meantime, not totally filling the sink, or putting the plug in is holding the make shift job together until I get some putty and check out underneath the sink.
Think I will call a friend who remodels bathrooms all the time and see if he has some instead of buying a whole jar of putty for 1/4 inch piece, he would probably fix it anyway.

Thanks all for your responses and advice! :)

Jiffy
Re: Kitchen Sink - Help!
A. Spruce wrote:

Again, without pictures or personal inspection, we can't tell you anything about the strainer or the drain system.

From the sounds of it a new strainer may take care of the problem, but this is only a guess from the limited information provided.

How can anyone add a picture if this site says "you need to post atleast 10 messages before adding a link or attaching picture to this thread".

johnjh2o
Re: Kitchen Sink - Help!

Try typing your link with quotation marks. Then we can copy and paste the link less the quotation marks. Someday, hopefully they will allow links without having to have ten posts.

John

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