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Kitchen Floor

I would like to replace the floor in our kitchen,I have tried all of the "TRICKS" to stop squeeks and now want to rip the floor out and replace the floor.I have been told it is probably where the glue in the plywood has given out and it is one squeeky mes

A. Spruce
Re: Kitchen Floor

More likely the problem is that the subfloor is not glued to the joists and regular nails or a poor nailing method were used.

Expansion and contraction will eventually loosen a regular, smooth shanked nail, allowing the substrate to slide up and down the nail and cause the squeak. Poor nailing method refers to "shiners", nails that only partially penetrated the joist before glancing out the side, again, causing a spot for a squeak to develop.

What I would start with is to pull the underlayment and vinyl out to expose the subfloor. Then, walk/bounce around the room until you find the squeaks. Next, tap a nail around the perimeter of the squeaking fastener to determine the location of the joist and drive a new fastener into solid purchase. For the probing, use a regular nail, for the permanent fastening, use a ring shank. Once the new nail is installed, pull the old one out and retest for the squeak. Another option would be to pull the subfloor as well, apply glue to the joists, reinstall the subfloor with ring shanks.

Lastly, depending on the new floor covering, you may need to beef up the joists and subfloor to support the added weight, as can be the case with tile.

bp21901
Re: Kitchen Floor

To add to Spruce's suggestion....and it may be overkill....but...

If you do test around for and fix the squeaky areas after you get to the subfloor layer then add a couple ring shank nails (or screws) everywhere along the joist line even where you don't presently have a squeak.

You don't want to cover everything back up with the finish flooring only to have another squeak develop later. :eek:

Re: Kitchen Floor

what Bruce said...but I'd use screws instead of nails to pull the floor tight to the joists and have holding power.
Just personal taste is all.

A. Spruce
Re: Kitchen Floor

Screws are actually quite brittle, which is why they are not "code" in most jurisdictions.

Re: Kitchen Floor
A. Spruce wrote:

Screws are actually quite brittle, which is why they are not "code" in most jurisdictions.

Well, I don't know about anywhere else but here on LI in NY you certainly can use screws and most of us do unless you're one of the big builders that only want to use nailguns to save time.
I'd say maybe one in fifty screws might snap when i go to screw them in..if that.. and when they do I know it and just screw in another but with squeeky floors I don't see how nails will pull down the subfloor if the joist is crowned badly which is my guess in this case.
If one were worried about snapping screws I'd use both screws and nails if that would put your mind at ease but in order to pull down the subfloor I wouldn't hold much faith in nails alone.
In a perfect world it would be nice to get some PL Premium glue between the joists and subfloor but in this case I doubt its possible so if it were me I'd definatly use screws and I don't mean drywall screws.
Here's the screw I use.
http://www.mcfeelys.com/product/0820-FTY/FH-Yellow-Zinc-T20-Star-Drive

and here's a little bit of some more info for you on flooring screws from McFeely's who I use all the time and consider to be very reliable and knowledgable people.
http://www.mcfeelys.com/tech/subfloor.aspx

One other option which I have used several times for my customers in the past for squeeks under already finished floors from MCFeely's is:
http://www.mcfeelys.com/product/SNM-3320/Squeek-No-More-Hardwood-Floor-Kit-w25-Screws

JacktheShack
Re: Kitchen Floor

I also strongly favor the use of screws for floors.

But, to each his own.

A. Spruce
Re: Kitchen Floor

I knew when I made that last post there was going to be some debate. Please note that the use of screws wasn't condemned, the only comment was that most jurisdictions don't like them. My apologies if it came across any other way. I too have been inclined to use screws on occasion. :cool:

Re: Kitchen Floor
A. Spruce wrote:

I knew when I made that last post there was going to be some debate. Please note that the use of screws wasn't condemned, the only comment was that most jurisdictions don't like them. My apologies if it came across any other way. I too have been inclined to use screws on occasion. :cool:

Not to get off the subject of squeeky floors but being we're talking about screws some, it made me think about something I learned not to long ago about using screws on CBU's to subfloors that I thought I'd share if anyone cares :D
I was always down on people that used roofers for CBU's to floors even though I know its in the specs if one chooses to use em'. I just felt that CBU screws were much better but then I came to the conclusion that screws are kind of a waste of time and money in that application...the reason being that CBU's need to be thinset down and once the thinset dries I'd have to say the fasteners ain't doin' a whole lot anymore...maybe some..but not enogh to justify using screws. CBU screws are expensive and whats worse is I HATE using them. I think I've F'd my fingers up more with those damn screws than just about any other fastner...lol.
Sorry for the hijacked ramble:p

A. Spruce
Re: Kitchen Floor

Back when I was getting started in the trade, I was working for a contractor that had 3 or 4 carpenters (including me ) on staff. Every day we pretty much had our own jobs to go take care of, unless it was a large project, then several of us would be there. Anyway, the young buck was sent out to tear out a dryrotted bathroom floor and repair it ready for the floor guy to lay the vinyl. About an hour before the day ends I get a frantic phone call from the boss to go "rescue" the young buck, who mysteriously had a water fall emanating from the general area of the ceiling light fixture below the bathroom he was working in.

When laying the subfloor he had driven a nail into the water line that was under it. And you'll never guess who got to clean up after him ... :rolleyes: :D :D :D

Is it technically off topic if your story relates to it? :p :p

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