Home>Discussions>KITCHENS>Keeping milled lumber
7 posts / 0 new
Last post
studyingtobehandy
Keeping milled lumber

Looking through the discussion boards I couldn't find a board on woodworking so I thought this would be the best forum for my question. I recently purchased a moderate amount of quarter-sawn oak lumber. I've taken the lumber to a shop to be milled and glued up for some furniture projects. I have a heated garage, but I'm wondering what temp. I should maintain in the garage in order to prevent any damage to the glue-ups.

Debra
Re: Keeping milled lumber

treat it like you would the furniture you plan to build, keep it the temps you keep the house.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Keeping milled lumber

Temperature is generally not a problem, humidity can be. If you are storing it for a long period of time it should be stickered, stacked, and the ends sealed. this allows air flow on all sides so it drys or picks up moisture evenly. Sealing the ends prevents the ends from drying faster and splitting the wood. If you are planning to use it right away just don't stack it on the concrete.
Jack

studyingtobehandy
Re: Keeping milled lumber

Well, I do plan on starting into the projects right away. It could be a few months before I get started on the last one, and as they say ".....the best of intentions.....". So just be protect the investment I guess sealing the ends would be well worth it. What would you recommend, is straight poly enough? As you know we're having a pretty cold spell here in Ohio the last couple weeks. In the interest of keeping my propane costs down do you see any problems in keeping the lumber in an unheated garage, if the ends are sealed, and the boards are stacked with spacers between them.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Keeping milled lumber

As I said temperature is not a problem, I store some of mine in an open front shed all year around, some people even store their wood outside with a cover over it. Uneven drying is the problem that's why you sticker it when you stack it to alow air flow all the way around. You seal the ends because they have a tendency to dry out faster that the rest of thewood and that causes spliting. You can seal the ends even with left over paint. By the way, I hope the lumber was dry before you had it milled and glued.
Hope that helps.
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: Keeping milled lumber
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Uneven drying is the problem that's why you sticker it when you stack it to alow air flow all the way around. You seal the ends because they have a tendency to dry out faster that the rest of thewood and that causes spliting.

Think of a board like a bundle of straws. Along the length, the straws cannot pass moisture very easily, however at the end, you have a series of tubes that allow moisture to flow quite freely, this is why you seal the ends.

The same can be said for gluing, which is why gluing end grain will not work. To successfully glue end grain you either have to mill finger joints in the pieces or use a spline. :)

studyingtobehandy
Re: Keeping milled lumber

I may not know everything, but I do know some things. I think somebody famous said that. Yes the wood was dry prior to being milled; kiln dried actually. I picked up the wood this past weekend and found a major problem. The guy had taken it down to 5/8. Still working out the details on how he is going to "make it right".

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.