Home>Discussions>DOORS & WINDOWS>Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
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Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
A. Spruce wrote:

Oh man, you should have hired a professional, that looks like something I would have done . . . Oh wait a minute . . . -wink- :p:cool:

That looks very good, my friend, you did a great job! Glad you like the results, and thanks for posting an update on your project. Be careful whom you show this to, they may want you to come to their house and install trim for them too! ;):cool:

Hahah, thanks! I really appreciate it. Yeah... I am super-pleased with how this came out. I'm also glad that I took my time when I did it. I'm not suggesting that I can rush the next project... but there were times I just wanted to finish it, but didn't have the right parts or tools, and I just waited. I'm going to do my bedroom closet now, and I've also decided to convert a hallway to a laundry room.

Several years ago, I had a home addition put in, basically, the enclosed half of my patio, but actually poured a new slab, poured concrete walls for the two new walls, and even added new roof trusses. We now use the old patio doors to enter into the bedroom, so the hallway doesn't really make a lot of sense. Along that hallway there's the laundry room (more bi-folds open to the washer / dryer), and then bi-folds that open to the air handler and water heater. I HATE those bi-folds... but figured if I put a door at the other end of the hall, we could remove those bifolds and repurpose that space appropriately for a large utility closet / laundry room. No one goes through that hall anyway.

dj1 wrote:

Now, tell us: do you think you needed a door casing or not?

Oh yeah, I don't know what I was thinking. It looks so much better now with it like this.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
Mastercarpentry

Looks great! Creating the laundry will be a little tougher with the plumbing and electrical involved but I'd bet you're up to that based on what I've seen so far.

Happy DIY'ing :cool:
Phil

Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
Mastercarpentry wrote:

Looks great! Creating the laundry will be a little tougher with the plumbing and electrical involved but I'd bet you're up to that based on what I've seen so far.

Happy DIY'ing :cool:
Phil

I appreciate the vote of confidence! The room already exists (it's a hallway now). The washer/dryer are in there, but they're covered by... BIFOLDS!!!

So I'm just going to tear out the bifolds, and close off the hallway and turn the room into a laundry room and make use of that space. The hallway is no longer needed since we had a home addition put on, and we get to that bedroom through another door now. I will basically just install another door so the hallway will technically be there, but it'll now be a utility closet / laundry room that just happens to have two doors going to it.

It'll also stop guests from going down a long hallway to our bedroom when they take a wrong turn looking for the guest bathroom.

A. Spruce
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
A. Spruce

If the space is at the end of a hallway, then one door will be sufficient, however, if you are closing the laundry off to other portions of the house, then I'd recommend installing two doors, one on each side of the designated laundry room. This will allow you to access the space from either side, rather than having to go all around and through the house to get there. Trust me, you wife won't be pleased with the disruption to her space!

Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?

Hey guys, just wanted to say thanks again for the help. I haven't started on the laundry room yet, but I did order the pre-hung slab door and will get started on it.

I wanted to show another project I've worked on since.

I re-modeled my master bathroom vanity area, which also included replacing a set of sliding doors, and framing in another louvered closet door:

Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?

And then I also tackled the closet... which was a disaster (see first pic)

First I got everything out, and stripped the room:

Then I stripped the popcorn off the ceiling, painted the ceiling and the walls, and installed the same tile (love that tile).

Then installed cabinets and shelving, and then installed the baseboard behind it. I purchased a single shelving unit from Lowes, but cut and stained everything else myself.

All the shelving (except the standing unit) was made using reclaimed wood from a shelving unit in my father-in-law's storage unit that I helped him clean out. It was good solid wood. I made a support beam all around, used construction adhesive and tied it into the metal studs behind. And then used nickel plated shelving brackets which I screwed directly into the wood.

I also made a little bench... and interestingly enough, where the two clothing poles intersect at the top, I joined them using a 1-1/4" chain link fence "T-Coupler"... which worked perfectly!

When I was framing in the door, I realized I could make some use of that space, so I decided to make a little area for my wife to hang her long jewelry. My dad thinks it looks like the little opening that you buy your supplies from on a Navy ship, hahah... but I dunno.

Now I have to figure out what the next project is. I'm pretty sure I'm going to do the laundry room since I already ordered a new door for it... but I should be able to bang that out in a couple of weeks.

I'm really procrastinating on the actual bathroom though because I'm really nervous what to do with the shower stall. Last time I paid someone to repair some of the tile there, and it looked like someone had tiled over the existing shower pit with another pan and more tile... I can only imagine what it must look like under there. Everything is on a concrete slab since we don't have basements in Florida...

A. Spruce
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
A. Spruce

Nice work, Todd. :cool:

As to the shower, when it doubt, tear it out and start over.

Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?

Thanks Spruce... I'll probably make a post in the plumbing area... but I'm definitely nervous... for that very reason. Don't know what to expect, and don't want to get to the point where I have to pay someone to help fix my mistakes. I've been able to do everything myself so far, which has lowered the cost considerably... but I just don't know what to expect behind the tile.

One thing I find interesting is... on at least two of the walls to my shower, it backs up against my exterior wall, which is solid concrete. Why then do I need drywall (or green board? Or whatever it's called) between the solid concrete and the tile?

Thanks!

A. Spruce
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
A. Spruce

As a DIY'r, probably the easiest thing for you to do will be to demo the whole thing, then install a preformed pan. Personally, I prefer cultured stone pans over fiberglass, however, either will work fine, they both install the same way, which is drop in place, shim if necessary, and set a rubber donut around the drain neck/waste line. Tiling a pan is a lot more involved, not something I'd recommend for a DIY'r, unless you've got some serious tile experience, and have seen a few pan installations before. Tile the walls all you want, the pan itself takes knowledge and skill.

What will you find when you do the demo? Every instance is different, but you'll likely find that the pan area, assuming tiled already, will have a tar coated layer between it and the floor and around the curb line. This is to create a sealed "tub" for the mortar and tile to sit inside of, that way if it ever leaks, it's still captured and drained down the drain. The walls will simply be drywalled, depending on the builder/installer you will find direct glued tile, tile backer board, or a mortar bed behind the tile. With drywall involved, it's easier to rip to bare studs and redrywall. Over block walls I have no idea what you should expect. I'm guessing that if you have drywall interiors on that block, then you will find sleepers between the drywall and block, possibly even insulation. I have never dealt with a tiled block wall before, so I can't tell you whats there or how it should go back together.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
Mastercarpentry

Good to see you return here Todd- the work looks lovely and I like the use of fence hardware in this manner to solve a problem in a far better way than I've ever seen or done. That idea is a rock-solid keeper!

Shower pans are critical so I usually say 'get a plumber', but you're the kind who can probably do as good or better so go for it. Arm yourself with knowledge from the John Bridge tile forum and the Terry Love plumbing forum and do use a pre-formed stone pan. Fiberglass isn't bad but stone is less prone to damage, it's expansion rate more closely matches tile and your concrete walls/slab, and is an upgrade that will match the rest of the work you're doing. One 'caveat' is to check your local building code and permit office as this may require signing-off by a licensed plumber in which case you may not be able to DIY the pan but you should be able to do the rest. As always, when the walls are open that's the time to inspect, upgrade, and repair anything in them before you cover them back up.

And if you want a career-change you seem well-qualified to jump into the business with us :cool: Kudos!

Phil

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