Home>Discussions>DOORS & WINDOWS>Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
21 posts / 0 new
Last post
Todd82TA
Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
Todd82TA

Hi gang, I just replaced a bi-fold closet door in my office with a pre-hung louvered closet door. I'm super-happy with the look and feel. If it looks horrible, you can blame A. Spruce because he was the one that gave me all the pointers a couple of months ago. Hahah...

In any case, I shimmed, levelled, and everything else that I believe I was supposed to do. All I needed to do to get the correct fitment was install a 2x4x81 on the left side up against the steel framing to give the door a bit more support. I filled the voids in and around the door frame to give it a bit more confident feel (or less cheap feel) when you shut the door.

So my question is, how abnormal would it be if I did NOT install trim around this door? Originally, the door was a bi-fold, and the frame around the opening was simply just 90 degree angles of drywall with edging. There was no frame around it; however, all the doors and window openings do have trim around it.

Now that I have a door in there, I am not sure if I should install trim, or if it would look just as good (or better) by edging off the drywall? Just looking for ideas.

Keep in mind that this is a South Florida house with reeks of 80s Modern design... which I do secretly like and kind of want to keep it that way. But, I have no design sense, so if this would look ridiculous, please tell me.

Only issue I see is that the door is framed close to the wall, so I would not be able to install full trim on the left side.

Thanks!

dj1
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
dj1

Congratulations for the fine job of fitting a new closet door.

Now finish the job, by installing casing (door trim molding).

It looks like you are limited with the width on the left side, so go and find a casing that will fit. Also, the casing should go all the way down to the floor, meaning, you will need to trim the base molding.

A. Spruce
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
A. Spruce

My fault, eh? Why I oughta . . . :p:cool:

I would recommend trimming the door to match everything else in the house, it will look better that way. The easiest way to deal with the narrow strip along the hinge side would be to put a piece of square stock in there that is equal to or slightly thicker than the trim you use. Cut the square stock to fit tight against the wall and leave about a 1/4" reveal between the inside edge of the jamb leg and the inner edge of the square stock. The square stock will run from floor to the top, outer edge of the header trim piece. Your header and right jamb leg trim should also have the same 1/4" reveal between the inner edge of the jamb and the inner edge of the trim piece. The header piece will butt into the square stock and be mitered where it meets the right side leg trim.

The right leg of trim will also run all the way to the floor, which means you'll have to trim back the baseboard a touch to accommodate the trim. A fine tooth handsaw or Japanese pull saw will do nicely here.

Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
dj1 wrote:

Congratulations for the fine job of fitting a new closet door.

Now finish the job, by installing casing (door trim molding).

It looks like you are limited with the width on the left side, so go and find a casing that will fit. Also, the casing should go all the way down to the floor, meaning, you will need to trim the base molding.

Ok, thanks... I appreciate it. IS it ok to select casing for that door, even if it's not the same sized casing as used on the window and the primary door?

A. Spruce wrote:

My fault, eh? Why I oughta . . . :p:cool:

I would recommend trimming the door to match everything else in the house, it will look better that way. The easiest way to deal with the narrow strip along the hinge side would be to put a piece of square stock in there that is equal to or slightly thicker than the trim you use. Cut the square stock to fit tight against the wall and leave about a 1/4" reveal between the inside edge of the jamb leg and the inner edge of the square stock. The square stock will run from floor to the top, outer edge of the header trim piece. Your header and right jamb leg trim should also have the same 1/4" reveal between the inner edge of the jamb and the inner edge of the trim piece. The header piece will butt into the square stock and be mitered where it meets the right side leg trim.

The right leg of trim will also run all the way to the floor, which means you'll have to trim back the baseboard a touch to accommodate the trim. A fine tooth handsaw or Japanese pull saw will do nicely here.

Thanks Spruce, I appreciate it! Quick question though... all the other closet doors in this house do not have trim around them. Only the entryway doors and windows are cased, do you suggest I still put casing around it?

I want to make sure I totally understand what you're saying. Are you suggesting that on the left side of the door, I install square stock going all the way from the floor to the header, and then the header and right side of the door is normal casing? Or am I misunderstanding?

Thanks!

I apologize for any dumb questions, I'm still very new at this!

A. Spruce
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
A. Spruce

Yes, I would recommend trimming the door, even though other closets do not have trim, here's why. You've got a paint line that won't likely blend in with new paint, plus, the crack between the jamb and drywall doesn't look good and won't hold caulk to be nonexistent. Trim will finish the look of the door, best of all, you won't have to repaint the wall to blend in the new door/trim to the wall. The one thing I would recommend is that the trim be painted BEFORE you install it, thus saving you time and headache. Once installed, you simply fill the nail holes with spackle or similar filler and touch up the paint, no mess, no hassles.

By "square stock", I simply mean a piece of wood with no profile on it. It will need to be the same or slightly thicker than your header and right jamb leg trim so that it looks like you meant to put it there, rather than having it look like it was goobered into place. The square stock will actually be more rectangular to fit the width of the space between the side wall and jamb.

Yes, the square stock will go from floor to the top of the jam, PLUS, the height of the header trim. If you look at other doors with trim, you'll see the side leg is usually mitered to the head piece, they extend from floor to top of the head piece. In this instance, you won't be mitering because you don't have space for the trim, hence the square stock. The square stock still needs to go to the top edge of the header trim, then the header trim butts into the side of the square stock. The right corner will be a standard mitered corner. All of this, of course, is assuming that you're trim is either going to be bevel casing or colonial casing, something with a profile on it. If the trim is all flat "square" stock, then you miter both corners as usual.

dj1
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
dj1

Spruce just said what I wanted to say...follow his advice.

Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?

i like your adivice..

Mastercarpentry
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
Mastercarpentry

In situations like that, my usual is to rip the standard trim to fit so the whole house is 'together'. Based on where the cut lands on he trim it can kook great or awful, so cutting it narrower to make the trim look better sometimes looks better, but that leaves a really small corner to paint. Sometimes the wall od door will be out of plumb making the trim need to taper- usually looks awful so then I rip too narrow as above. My 'twist' on Spruce's 'square stock filler' is to match the thickness to the thin edge of the trim, then stop it into the bottom of the header trim which will then go square to the wall.

Lots of options here, measure space and trim then use whichever one will look best. You've got the inside to do too so start there as a prototype if you're not certain how something will look or work- easier to fix damage inside the somewhat hidden closet than inside the far more visible room!

Phil

Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?

I finally got around to installing the door casing! I think it came out really well. I still have to paint the door and part of the trim, and do some final touchup, but I'm really pleased how it came out! Thanks everyone!

A. Spruce
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
A. Spruce
Todd82TA wrote:

I finally got around to installing the door casing! I think it came out really well. I still have to paint the door and part of the trim, and do some final touchup, but I'm really pleased how it came out! Thanks everyone!

Oh man, you should have hired a professional, that looks like something I would have done . . . Oh wait a minute . . . -wink- :p:cool:

That looks very good, my friend, you did a great job! Glad you like the results, and thanks for posting an update on your project. Be careful whom you show this to, they may want you to come to their house and install trim for them too! ;):cool:

dj1
Re: Just swapped out bi-folds, should I install trim?
dj1

Now, tell us: do you think you needed a door casing or not?

Pages

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.