9 posts / 0 new
Last post
Duncan409
jackpost washers
Duncan409

While repairing termite damage on the front of the house and entry door, once the sheetrock was removed and studs exposed (what was left of them) I found 2 metal washers on the jackstuds on both sides of the entry door. They were about an inch and a quarter round, about a sixteenth inch thick, and a center hole of about 3/8 inch. They were just sitting on the top of the 2 innermost jackstuds. Not nailed or screwed to anything, but sitting there between the stud and the header. House is about 60 years old. I seem to recall someone telling me this was a practice a long time ago and actually served a real purpose. Can anyone tell me what they were for ?
thanks.

canuk
Re: jackpost washers
canuk

Curious .... never seen anything like that ... including the washers.

Might be a regional thing.

canuk
Re: jackpost washers
canuk
YukYuk wrote:

The loose washers are just spacers keeping things from settling or pinching, and as you slipped in the metal sheeting, you pushed them back, sometimes you knocked them out and retrieved them to use again, sometimes they fell into the wall or ended up in the dust bin.

Also if was making a repair/replacement of old flashing, you'd pull out, slip in washers as spacers which would just be pushed aside as you slipped in the replacement.

Hmmm .... with the weight of the header and the subsequent loads from above ..... how would the washers stay loose?

canuk
Re: jackpost washers
canuk
YukYuk wrote:

I'm sorry you can't see this, its not bearing. We used to do this all the time with stick framing in the post war building boom, then framed a door after the metal workers did the pans and flashing then the door jamb was framed. No pre-hung doors in those days.

Might be a regional thing.
Geez .... you were building houses during the post war building boom?

canuk
Re: jackpost washers
canuk
YukYuk wrote:

Yes. Four score and four years young. How young are you?

Well ... since my father was a carpenter and my grandfather was a carpenter building pre and post war homes ... I haven't seen what you've described.
Might be a regional thing.

Re: jackpost washers
YukYuk wrote:

I'm sorry you can't see this, its not bearing. We used to do this all the time with stick framing in the post war building boom, then framed a door after the metal workers did the pans and flashing then the door jamb was framed. No pre-hung doors in those days.

Nope they we probably dropped by someone when bolting the bottom plate to the concrete or block. Most all bottom plates are bolted to the foundation. Since it was the front entry door it is a bearing wall!!!

canuk
Re: jackpost washers
canuk
YukYuk wrote:

Hmmmmm. Huh? Its a non-bearing jamb nailer inside a door opening. The header, kings and first jacks are bearing. Here on planet earth when we drop something it falls down towards the ground, doesn't float seven feet up, hover-float laterally and tuck itself under a header to rest on the top edge/ledge of a nailer! Must be a regional gravity thing:D.

I'm sorry ...... you still have me confused about your description of letting in flashing for things like drip edges .... to the inside of the framing.
Wouldn't this encourage moisture infiltration?

I know of a practise back in the day ..... sheet lead was used for the membrane (spline) around windows and doors ..... though it wasn't let in to the framing.

Fortunately or unfortunately .... I had captured your post stating your age and that you were building homes back in the day..... before you deleted it.
Perhaps you might have used the lead flashing back in the day?

It may have been the guy cutting the lumber may have goofed .... cut on the wrong side of his line and decided to use the washers as shims?

It's very possible he was using a hand saw for cutting back in the day and didn't feel like doing them over.

canuk
Re: jackpost washers
canuk
YukYuk wrote:

however your activities don't encourage me to advance your education.

I'm sorry you feel that way .... since I don't know everything about everything .... always willing to learn.
Isn't that what this forum is all about?

Anyway .... my apology to the original poster if this thread has gotten off track. :)

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.