Home>Discussions>NEW DIY IDEAS>Remodels & Upgrades>Is it feasible to add an extra 6 ft across the entire length of the 1st floor?
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dlrose51
Is it feasible to add an extra 6 ft across the entire length of the 1st floor?

I have a 4x4, center-stair colonial. I want to keep my formal DR & LR, which are in the front of the house either side of the stairs. However, I want to open up the entire back of the house to make it 1 open area. Now it has a kitchen, bathroom, & FR. The breezeway is going to be expanded to be the depth of the house and will contain the bathroom, laundry, mudroom, & pantry.

Moving the bathroom and taking down the separating walls will create a 36 ft X ~11 ft kitchen/FR area. While that will be better than the current separate rooms, it will be rather narrow.

So I'd like to add another 6 ft to the 1st floor across the entire back of the house to make the area 36 ft X ~17 ft. Can that be done? Would it require a 36 ft support beam? Has anyone had any experience with something like this?

I am obviously hiring a contractor and perhaps will need an architect as well. However, I'd like to know if I should even ask about it. If it is utterly ridiculous, I won't. If it is doable, what kind of questions should I ask the contractor to make sure he knows what he's doing so my 2nd floor won't fall down! Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Deb

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Is it feasible to add an extra 6 ft across the entire length of the 1st floor?

Of course it's possible, but it's going to be very expensive per sq ft as compared to adding one room let's say 16x20 and limiting it to perhaps an 8ft opening into the old house. The beam size needed to support what you want will be massive if it absolutely cannot have a post dividing it mid-span.
Casey

dj1
Re: Is it feasible to add an extra 6 ft across the entire length of the 1st floor?

Step 1: verify with your building department. They will tell you whether you can add that much or not.

In my area, a building must be a certain distance from property lines, and in some cases, folks don't have space to add.

If you are clear, call architects for their opinions, and if you have a green light (and dough) - get plans.

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