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faacks
insulation

i live in a very old house. a portion of which is log walled construction. the east addition houses kitchen and large pantry. the north addition houses the three bedrooms and baths. the north walls seem to remain very cold during the winter months. these walls are more than six inches thick but i suspect have a very substandard insulation factor. these bedrooms are on poured slab, while the center of the house is over a basement.
my question, would i be better off trenching along the north wall and inserting board insulation to break contact with the soil that freezes and never receives any sun during winter months or digging down several inches and doing a ground cover with board insulation? my theory is that by breaking the slabs contact with the frozen soil i will use the ambient soil temperature to my benefit
i could do an experiment using a portion of the wall employing both methods and incorporating thermometers, etc but as i just turned 68 years old i would like to solve the problem while i'm young
any help greatly appreciated. i know it is mid summer but i would like to get the project completed before the snow flies and i am the one that is going to have to do the work

canuk
Re: insulation
Quote:

i live in a very old house. a portion of which is log walled construction

I'm guessing these are solid logs?
If that's the case wood has an R value of about 1 per inch of depth .... so with a solid log around 6 inches diameter you have have a little better than R7.
If the logs are stacked horizontally the weak point will be the chinking. If it's weak it may be drafty.

Quote:

my question, would i be better off trenching along the north wall and inserting board insulation to break contact with the soil that freezes and never receives any sun during winter months or digging down several inches and doing a ground cover with board insulation? my theory is that by breaking the slabs contact with the frozen soil i will use the ambient soil temperature to my benefit

Applying rigid foam around the perimeter will help some though there will still be cold migration from the ground under the slab. The ground frost will likely penetrate the soil deeper than you will be placing the insulation.
So ... you would need to dig the entire area around the slab deeper than the ground frost line and place the rigid insulation the entire depth to prevent the frost getting under the slab.

You might consider applying rigid foam insulation directly to the slab inside then cover with plywood as a subfloor .... this will provide a thermo break from the cold slab. There is also the consideration of adding in-floor radiant heat.

Just a thought. :)

NEC
Re: Do I have any other choice
ghij641 wrote:

One day,Eve asked Adam,"Do you really love me?" ]

Adam said, "Look at what a hell of a mess we created". "Love you?"

"You must be out of your ever lov'n freak'n mind!"

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