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CatherineSlaton
Insulating inaccessible entryway crawlspace
CatherineSlaton

I am weatherproofing a very small (600 sf) cottage/cabin built in 1927 in North Seattle and have been able to insulate between all the floor joists from the crawlspace, but the one spot I cannot crawl under is the entryway. It is very small (4X7). Even with tearing off the skirting, there is not enough space for me to access. Well - I can get my arms under. This is an old porch that was converted to an entry way. The flooring is pretty beat up, so I could conceivable drill large holes and put in insulation that way. I'm pretty sure I could slide in a moisture barrier from the three sides that have skirting, maybe using a 1X2 to ease it into place.

Should I pull off the skirting, then insulate the exterior foundation walls of the entry? I could also measure out the new skirting board and attach the insulation to it before setting into place (leaving the space for any framing empty.)

Any ideas? I'm using electric heat and want to save on power bills so am insulating every spot I can.

Thanks.

Catherine

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Insulating inaccessible entryway crawlspace
HoustonRemodeler

What is stopping you from digging a trench to fit underneath ?

dj1
Re: Insulating inaccessible entryway crawlspace
dj1

Quote: " Should I pull off the skirting, then insulate the exterior foundation walls of the entry? I could also measure out the new skirting board and attach the insulation to it before setting into place (leaving the space for any framing empty.) "

Sure, why not?

Mastercarpentry
Re: Insulating inaccessible entryway crawlspace
Mastercarpentry

You mentioned that the flooring is rather tatty so there is your solution- remove the flooring, add the insulation from above, then replace with new flooring. Something to consider here is that new building codes require 16" of clearance from wood to ground, the reason being both to allow access like you are lacking and to insure enough airspace exists to mitigate moisture build-up which may cause rot. So while you've got it open you might at least make a trench to where you can get in there from your house's crawlspace to inspect things in the future so long as that does not turn into a lake in rainy weather from groundwater or compromise your homes foundation strength.

It's rarely a good idea to re-purpose porches into conditioned space to increase a home's area because of things like this and other reasons, yet it is commonly done and is sometimes totally successful. As long as the space underneath is dry and well ventilated with no signs of settling or shifting you'll probably be OK and the upgrade work worth doing.

Phil

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