Home>Discussions>DOORS & WINDOWS>Insulate Stained Glass Window for Winter
3 posts / 0 new
Last post
carringtonf
Insulate Stained Glass Window for Winter

I have a huge stained glass window that was imported from Germany in the early 1900s (1910 as far as I can find). It was originally created in the mid 1800s. It's bowed and has some spots where the glass comes away from the lead (at least it looks like lead) lining.

It's about 8' by 4' and I need to insulate it for the winter. Cold air not only blows through the gaps, the glass itself is not very insulated at all. I can feel a cold patch and the foyer (where it and another old large window are located) is at least 10 degrees cooler than the adjacent rooms.

Is there anything I can do to significantly insulate this and the other window without risking any damage to either? It has all original moldings around it and beautiful plaster walls that I'd be very disappointed if I were to damage any of the reasons we purchased the house.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Insulate Stained Glass Window for Winter

Most often people mount plexiglass on the outside. You can use aluminum bar stock to add dividers as needed to accommodate the available plexi size you can find. Try to align the crossbars as best you can so as not to interfere with the design. If the window faces south, you should be aware that the greenhouse effect is going to speed up the deterioration of the window. But you are already aware that it needs repairs. A re-leading (basically taking the thing apart and replacing the ruined/worn-out lead) is going to require removal. Can't be done standing in place, must be laid flat; so having such a storm window will give a good temporary enclosure while that's being done.
Casey

jeffcat
Re: Insulate Stained Glass Window for Winter
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

Most often people mount plexiglass on the outside. You can use aluminum bar stock to add dividers as needed to accommodate the available plexi size you can find. Try to align the crossbars as best you can so as not to interfere with the design. If the window faces south, you should be aware that the greenhouse effect is going to speed up the deterioration of the window. But you are already aware that it needs repairs. A re-leading (basically taking the thing apart and replacing the ruined/worn-out lead) is going to require removal. Can't be done standing in place, must be laid flat; so having such a storm window will give a good temporary enclosure while that's being done.
Casey

I'd agree with this. If it was a newer window, I'd seek other alternatives, but in the case of a window nearing it's service period in the near future, I would just put a barrier like plexiglass to help insulate the window more from the exterior effects of being against the weather.

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.