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electro89
Installing engineered hardwood over old hardwood
electro89

I want to install new hardwood flooring in my living room. The house was built in the 1960's and the hardwood currently creeks in most places. I have asked around on how I should approach this and came up with the following options:

1) rip out old hardwood and install new plywood subfloor, then install hardwood on top
2) screw down old hardwood every 6 inches and float engineered wood on top. In this situation, I was told nailing down solid wood wouldn't be a good idea.

keep in mind that there is currently a 3/4 inch step between the hardwood and the newly installed tile surrounding this room.

Thanks

A. Spruce
Re: Installing engineered hardwood over old hardwood
A. Spruce

You will hate yourself if you simply cover up the old flooring. Rip out the old before installing the new. When you install the new, use the appropriate thickness of plywood to bring your finished surface up equal to the tile height, barring any clearance issues around the area, such as baseboard heaters, radiators, etc. Door bottoms can be trimmed to accommodate new flooring height.

dj1
Re: Installing engineered hardwood over old hardwood
dj1

Another reason to remove the old floor: you will get a chance to find out why you had all those cricks and noises, fix them and replace any deficient wood.

electro89
Re: Installing engineered hardwood over old hardwood
electro89

I was told screwing down the old hardwood would get rid of any existing creaks.
Why would you say laying hardwood over the existing would be a bad idea?

A. Spruce
Re: Installing engineered hardwood over old hardwood
A. Spruce

What you were told is BS.

The squeaking floor is due to the strips of flooring rubbing on each other and on their fasteners. Screws will help, however, it will neither stop nor be a permanent fix due to the nature of wood, which is constantly expanding and contracting with temperature and humidity. All this movement loosens fasteners, even screws, the squeaks will return, and the last place you want a squeak is somewhere you will never be able to get to it again. This is why you do not lay new flooring over old, bad flooring.

In addition, as others have pointed out, there may be issues with the subfloor, which will be found and can be dealt with when the old flooring is pulled.

CountryLiving_DIYer
Re: Installing engineered hardwood over old hardwood
CountryLiving_DIYer

We installed an engineering click-together board over our existing hardwood flooring. (don't ask! house was fully carpeted when purchased and didn't know there was hardwood until AFTER we had purchased the flooring and had the pallets of new flooring dropped on the front lawn).
Dilemma: Now our floors are buckling all over the house. Additionally, there is a white moldy looking substance growing in some places underneath the underlayment.
Has anyone seen this before? We believe we have a moisture problem under the house (~1954 raised home, bricked to ground on the exterior w/access vents), but we have not yet gotten that problem solved either.

A. Spruce
Re: Installing engineered hardwood over old hardwood
A. Spruce
CountryLiving_DIYer wrote:

We installed an engineering click-together board over our existing hardwood flooring. (don't ask! house was fully carpeted when purchased and didn't know there was hardwood until AFTER we had purchased the flooring and had the pallets of new flooring dropped on the front lawn).
Dilemma: Now our floors are buckling all over the house. Additionally, there is a white moldy looking substance growing in some places underneath the underlayment.
Has anyone seen this before? We believe we have a moisture problem under the house (~1954 raised home, bricked to ground on the exterior w/access vents), but we have not yet gotten that problem solved either.

Sorry to say, the old floor should have been pulled and any issues dealt with before the new floor went in. If you've got moisture damage, your only choices now are to 1 - locate and mitigate the moisture problem, and 2 - replace the damaged flooring.

Unfortunately, manufacturers change the T&G design and colors of their products frequently, so the odds of you finding replacement materials is slim to none, which means total replacement. This time, do not leave the old hardwood in place, pull it all out, inspect the subfloor, repair what needs repair, then install your new flooring. As with the originator of this thread, the plywood you use as underlayment should be sized to bring the finished height of your flooring flush to other flooring elevations.

dj1
Re: Installing engineered hardwood over old hardwood
dj1

My condolences for good money wasted. Live and learn.

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