7 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lindad
I made a mess!

I did everything I was suppose to do in removing a very old wall mural. When we started peeling it off everything was looking good, then I noticed I was scraping the drywall off. I have a big mess. What do I do? This is a very old house
I do not know how long that mural had been there. Thanks, Lindad

A. Spruce
Re: I made a mess!

You can skim coat the frayed paper with "hot mud", which is a dry mixed taping compound, it chemically hardens like cement, rather than drying like normal drywall compound. Apply a layer, then carefully peel/cut off any fraying that puckers due to the moisture of the skim coat. Apply another layer of the hot mud, then switch to normal topping compound and skim with that to smooth the surface. Take your time to apply the layers as evenly as possible, as this will minimize the amount of sanding once you get out to your top coats. Between layers, take your taping knife and whisk it across the surface, this will knock down any ridges and lumps, minimizing the amount of floating and sanding you'll ultimately have to do to smooth the wall ready for texture and/or painting.

ordjen
Re: I made a mess!

Such a problem is not uncommon, especially where there was not a good underlying coat of primer and paint. the moisture neccessary to get the wallpaper paste to release, continues into the drywall. The softened drywall paper then gets gouged and ripped in the process of trying to pull and sc**** the old paper off.

I would let the wall dry down and then give it a quick sanding in an effort to level the surface and knock down the fuzzy, wrinkled drywall. Next, prime the entire area with a non-water soluble primer such as CoverStain or the Original Kilz. This will act to set the loose drywall and also to prevent moisture from the patcing to follow from continueing to fester up the drywall paper.

If any of the areas to be patched are deep, easy sand "hot mud", as Spruce suggests, is a good patching material. Otherwise, I personally prefer drywall topping compound for its ease of sanding. When sanding, use a sanding block to assure that the resulting patch is flat. Sanding with the hand usually results in waviness in the wall.
Once patched to your satisfaction, prime the patch. You can use normal water based wall primers this time, such as Zinsser's 123.

A. Spruce
Re: I made a mess!
ordjen wrote:

If any of the areas to be patched are deep, easy sand "hot mud", as Spruce suggests, is a good patching material. Otherwise, I personally prefer drywall topping compound for its ease of sanding. When sanding, use a sanding block to assure that the resulting patch is flat. Sanding with the hand usually results in waviness in the wall.
Once patched to your satisfaction, prime the patch. You can use normal water based wall primers this time, such as Zinsser's 123.

I've never primed a "fuzzy" surface, always opted for the hot mud instead, solely due to time constraints. I can apply hot mud in several layers in one afternoon, ready for a normal topping compound and be ready for primer and paint the next day. As a pro, I can do this and get away with it. For the average homeowner or DIY'r, the primer suggestion is the way to go. Following your suggestion of priming first, then absolutely use normal topping compound, as it is easier to apply and much easier to sand than any quick setting compound.:cool:

junkout
Re: I made a mess!

I usually do a couple coats of easysand 45 min mud sand then prime. after that it usually only takes one coat with compound that I tint with chalk so you can see the areas you need to spot prime and you are ready to go with paint. and I usually use solvent based primer so it doesn't lift any more and it dries much faster to but it does stink to high heaven.

ordjen
Re: I made a mess!

The problem is where you are down into the brown, pulpy, underlying drywall paper. The moisture in patcing compounds will often cause the brown paper to wrinkle or fester up. Pre-priming with a quick dry oil primer sets the nap of the paper and assures that the patching coupound will not cause the patch to wrinkle.

Wrinkling would not always happen. I would occasionally run cross drywall that did not wrinkle up. I don't know what the factor is that caused it to wrinkle or not. the oil primer was insurance. If the drywall paper wrinkles, the time set back is considerable as you wait for it to dry out enough to treat further.

I always carried EAsy Sand 20 imy truck as my preferred patching compound, mainly because working in Chicago, all the pre-mixed products would freeze in the winter and be ruined. Where time was not critical and doing large areas, i preferred to use drywall topping compound.

Re: I made a mess!

So sorry but glad you were able to get all this help!

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.