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dj1
A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
dj1

A new subdivision (looks like 50 new homes) is being developed near by me. The first 4 homes are almost finished, I think that they will serve as model homes.

Anyway, this morning I noticed that a huge cylinder tank is being put in the ground, close to the street. About 30' long and 10' in diameter. So far I saw an opening on top, about 24" in diameter. I will stop there tomorrow and see if they added any pipes to it.

Any ideas for the purpose of this tank?

This is not a flood zone, so it's not to catch runoff water.

Sewer is available at the street, so it's not a septic tank.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
Sombreuil_mongrel

Maybe a water tank for the fire dept to use.
Casey

HoustonRemodeler
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
HoustonRemodeler

Ascess to underground utilities? Are there power poles or is everything underground?

dj1
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
dj1
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

Maybe a water tank for the fire dept to use.
Casey

There are 2 fire hydrants on the side walk in front of the project (as part as the city's existing water supply system in the street).

dj1
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
dj1
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

Ascess to underground utilities? Are there power poles or is everything underground?

Too early to tell, because they just lowered the tank when I drove by. Utilities are now buried, but this tank is much bigger, than what would be the size for a 50 home project. This tank looks like a gas station tank, and it slices a big chunk of land where every square inch counts.

If I get a chance, I'll stop by today and ask them.

hollasboy
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
hollasboy

Secret government missile silo? Zombie apocalypse shelter? Dada-ist retirement home?

J/k - in Texas, we increasingly require storm water retention devices, typically upstream from the flood-prone area. So just because your area does not flood, does not mean they would not require upstream flood control to hold back water or slow its flow to relieve pinch points downhill from you, even if that is 100 miles away.

Buried gas station fuel tanks nowadays require some significant leak prevention, so those tanks are lined with polymer sealant, have electrical leak detection devices, and are double walled. And of course, they are always at or near a gas station.

I have also seen sewage sub-stations, also called "lift stations" used to collect and pump sewage to a higher elevation in the pipeline so it can continue under gravity to the downhill sewage plant.

ed21
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
ed21

Tanks like that are now common in subdivisions around me that don't have city water for the fire department to use. Even with a municipal water supply it still could be required in your drought prone area. What you describe is about a 20,000 gallon tank.
Could also be underground storm water management although I've seen systems other than big tanks used. Usually this is only done in high density or commercial development and often placed under parking areas to recharge ground water.
An underground sewage holding/pumping tank makes sense too. Never saw anything that big, but then again if underground who would. ;) Sewage pumping stations are fairly common around where I am, but never heard about large underground tanks. A small building and generator is all you can see.

dj1
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
dj1

I had a chance to visit the site this morning...and now there are two massive tanks in the huge hole. They were dumping gravel around the tanks this morning.

The mystery solved, and hollasboy is right on the money - these two tanks will collect rain water runoffs, if we get any rain, and the water will be used for irrigation.

Little background: A few years ago, some small cities around Los Angeles started giving away 100 gallon barrels to homeowners, to collect rain water off roofs for the purpose of using the water for future irrigation. Good idea, but then we had a 4 or 5 year drought and these barrels were never full. Even when they were full, the water was too little to irrigate much.

Fast forward: Today there is a new code in place, requiring new developments (not sure about the size, number of homes, etc), to collect rain water for irrigation.

This new development, by a local builder, Williams homes (their sign popped up yesterday), must meet the new code. They also have a website, williamshomes.com with some details about this development "Saticoy Homes". The number of homes built is not advertised, but it looks like about 50 or more, I couldn't see how deep it is.

This land was part of a church property, it was sitting vacant forever, and was one of the last vacant lands around. Finally the day came when on offer they couldn't refuse came in. Housing shortage and the sky high land prices made the deal possible, I guess. Like the old saying: Money talks, BS walks.

Fencepost
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
Fencepost

40,000 gallons is only about 1.5 acre-inches of water... or enough water to cover an acre of land an inch and a half deep. It hardly seems enough water for irrigation in the dry season, unless most of the land is xeriscaped (planted with drought-tolerant plants that don't require much water).

ed21
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
ed21

40,000 gallons is still is a lot of water. If it ever rains again at least that water can be used for irrigation later even if it's only for the developments landscaping.

Jack
Re: A Huge Tank in a New Subdivision
Jack

It would be a lot of water for a drip irrigation system.

Jack

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