Home>Discussions>BATHROOMS>how were these old metal drain pipes secured in the sleeve that comes up through the floor
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tr888
how were these old metal drain pipes secured in the sleeve that comes up through the floor
tr888

The house is late 1940s or early 1950s.   Second-floor bathroom.

The compression nut that attaches to the trap has corroded and crumbled away; so the candy-cane-shaped drainpipe, which goes down  into a sleeve of some kind in the floor, needs to be replaced.

The drainpipe won't turn in that sleeve using channel-lock pliers.  I don't know if this kind of drainpipe was sealed in place with caulk or putty or if it was typically secured in place inside the sleeve using a set screw (if so, the screw could be invisible below a layer of tile, since former owners tiled over tile).

The O.D. of the drain pipe is 32mm, which makes it pretty close to 1-1/4" actual.

How do I remove the drainpipe from the sleeve? Do I use two pipe wrenches, one for the sleeve and one for the drainpipe? Should I torch the connection first to loosen it?  Or do I need to chisel out the tile and find a set screw?

Thanks

HandyAndyInMtAiry
Re: how were these old metal drain pipes secured in the...
HandyAndyInMtAiry

Why would you want to remove it? Cut if off above the floor and use a compression connector to attach new brass pipe and "p" trap. Each section has a male female connection that is secured with hemp rope and lead. The hemp rope is used so that the amount of lead will be less. The connection shown in your picture is nothing more than a set of threads on each pipe. If you break that connection, you must replace the pipe.

Andrew

Handy Andy In Mt Airy NC

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