Home>Discussions>BATHROOMS>How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
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Colleen
How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
Colleen

We have a clawfoot tub where the legs are not attached to the tub with bolts. They just kind of hook on and what keeps them from sliding up and out from under the tub are some nails and screws that are acting like some sort of pin. I've tried to attach some photos.

What I'm wondering is what is supposed to go there besides a screw or nail to hold it in place? If I went into the hardware store to buy something to put there, what would I be looking to buy? What would have been there originally? The nails/screws seem very sturdy, but I just want to make sure there isn't something else I should be putting there...

I can't find anything online about this and have only ever seen legs bolted to a tub in the past.
Help!
Thanks!

Jack
Re: How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
Jack

Originally it was probably a metal pin or wedge possibly a tapered one.
Jack

stuart green
Re: How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
stuart green

Hardware stores carry a concrete nail ,also called cut nail, that has flat sides and is tapered. This will fit and hold the legs solidly until it is turned over. At this point the weight of the tub and water and the concrete nail will hold everything snug.

Jack
Re: How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
Jack

After a closer look at the pictures, I have to agree with YukYuk.
Jack

Colleen
Re: How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
Colleen

I've looked at the link for the retaining clip but can't for the life of me figure out how it works. Can someone explain this for me? Even when I rotate my photo like you suggest, I just can't envision where it goes, what holds it in place, etc....

Jack
Re: How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
Jack

Wow, YukYuk drawings now, what's next animation?:D
Good explanation also.
Jack

Colleen
Re: How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
Colleen

Thanks for the time you spent on that! I appreciate it.

Y5raleigh
Re: How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
Y5raleigh

How did your legs work on your tub with the nail?

nugentcn wrote:

We have a clawfoot tub where the legs are not attached to the tub with bolts. They just kind of hook on and what keeps them from sliding up and out from under the tub are some nails and screws that are acting like some sort of pin. I've tried to attach some photos.

What I'm wondering is what is supposed to go there besides a screw or nail to hold it in place? If I went into the hardware store to buy something to put there, what would I be looking to buy? What would have been there originally? The nails/screws seem very sturdy, but I just want to make sure there isn't something else I should be putting there...

I can't find anything ****** about this and have only ever seen legs bolted to a tub in the past.
Help!
Thanks!

woftt69
Re: How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
woftt69
Y5raleigh wrote:

How did your legs work on your tub with the nail?

I went to Lowes and purchased some "2 1/2" Cut Masonry Nails" they are wedge shaped. I drove them in with a hammer between the back of the bracket on the tub and the piece holding the foot. The forum doesn't seem to want to let upload pictures, but if you go find the nails I think you'll see what I'm talking about. Rough cut flooring nails may also work, they are more square and what I originally went looking for but couldn't find them. But with the masonary nails the feet are secure and tight enough I can pick the tub up (a few inches cuz it's heavy) by the feet.

Leora
Re: How to attach clawfoot tub legs?
Leora

Didn't you get any instruction manual along with the purchase? Usually when a customers buys a product which has some parts that are dismantled during the time of delivery, the customer gets a manual or a instruction booklet which he/she are to be followed while adjoining it. Recently I bought this Clawfoot tub which wasn't that hard to attach them correctly. All you have to make sure that the seller is providing you required instruction on adjoining them.

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