18 posts / 0 new
Last post
Ernie_Fergler
Re: how many outlets and lights
NEC wrote:

Could be, I guess. It would mean though that you could put every single receptacle in a home in a home on a single circuit, not limited by other NEC resrictions and meet the requirements of the NEC.

True but I always use the number eight as a cut off point. Once again no exact reason why using that number.:confused:

canuk
Re: how many outlets and lights
jkirk wrote:

gotta love the canadian code eh canuk. wheres old brpw to argue this topic when needed

Yep ... .....;)

Union Sparkie
Re: how many outlets and lights
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Voltage drop calculations are dependent on wire size, voltage, and load. As a general rule of thumb if you run over 100 feet you would go to the next size wire however for incandescent lights the only effect of the voltage drop would be slightly dimmer lights. There is no real code restrictions on length of run or allowable voltage drop.
I would suggest however that you run 12 ga (20 amp circuit) rather than 14ga for the outlets and have that separate from the lighting circuits. That way if you pop a breaker you won't be completely in the dark.
Jack

Oh, yes their is a NEC code about voltage drop. No more than 3% on branch circuits and no more than 5% on service and branch circuits.

As a rule. No more than 10 outlets on a circuit. Far as #14 AWG. Use #12. #14 is just control wire. You'll never see a union electrician use #14.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: how many outlets and lights
Union Sparkie wrote:

Oh, yes their is a NEC code about voltage drop. No more than 3% on branch circuits and no more than 5% on service and branch circuits.

As a rule. No more than 10 outlets on a circuit. Far as #14 AWG. Use #12. #14 is just control wire. You'll never see a union electrician use #14.

Actually there is not an NEC code, there is onlt a FPN (fine print note) An FPN is not a code requirement.
Jack

Ernie_Fergler
Re: how many outlets and lights
Union Sparkie wrote:

Oh, yes their is a NEC code about voltage drop. No more than 3% on branch circuits and no more than 5% on service and branch circuits.

As a rule. No more than 10 outlets on a circuit. Far as #14 AWG. Use #12. #14 is just control wire. You'll never see a union electrician use #14.

Very few non-union as well:D

havanagranite
Re: how many outlets and lights

union does does not denote quality it denotes unity

NEC
Re: how many outlets and lights

Jack is 100% correct on the voltage drop issue...... As a union electrician I pulled miles of #14 in residential applications.

We just stuck to a rule of 8 receptacles on a 15 amp circuit and 10 on a 20. Pretty simple in that 180va is allowed for each receptacle either way.

Pages

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.