Home>Discussions>INTERIORS>Living Areas & Workspaces>How do I remove old HEAVY billiard table?
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vegasgrrl24
How do I remove old HEAVY billiard table?

I want to remove an old pool table from my basement and it's extremely heavy so I'd like to break up the slate so I can carry it out of the house. Any advice on what tool would work? Thanks.

A. Spruce
Re: How do I remove old HEAVY billiard table?

Pool tables can be dismantled into manageable pieces. Fasteners will be hidden under and behind skirts. Remove the bumpers and rails and work your way down. If the whole thing is going to the dump, then no need for care, otherwise, be careful. The slate may or may not be anchored in place, again hidden fasteners. I'm trying to recall when our table was installed how the slate was set and I want to say that it was bolted through from the top, the holes and seams were then bondo'd (filled with auto body filler ). By removing the felt you'll be able to tell if this holds true for you. If so, chisel out the bondo, remove the bolts take the slate off in sections.

If you're not trying to save the table, then a crow bar and sawzall will have it dismantled in no time.

KCPumpkinStalker
Re: How do I remove old HEAVY billiard table?

Slate is very easy to fracture so a sledge will definitely do the trick. Also a good excuse to go out and buy the Ax blades for your Sawzall for demolition work. Always a good time! :D

Fencepost
Re: How do I remove old HEAVY billiard table?

Have you tried selling it to someone... they haul?

If the table isn't in good condition but the slate is still solid, you could go the recycling route. Dismantle it carefully, and either sell the slate to a salvage yard or have it turned into a countertop or a sink or.... whatever idea you can dream up.

vegasgrrl24
Re: How do I remove old HEAVY billiard table?

I was reading elsewhere about renting a (small) jackhammer like tool. Swinging a sledgehammer sounds fun, but it's SO HEAVY I'm worried about hurting myself. :(

I'm not worried about the condition the table ends up in, but am hoping I might salvage some of the slate for a walkway. :cool:

p.s. I do not have a bulkhead and there is no way to get it around the corner of our basement stairs.

Thanks!

sabo4545
Re: How do I remove old HEAVY billiard table?

Like others have said your best bet (especially if you want to try to use some of the slate) is to take it apart. Depending on the size of the table there is most likely 2 sheets of slate on the top. You should be able to remove the rails easily by unbolting or unscrewing them. Then remove the felt and figure out how the slate is attached and then remove it in the three sections. It will still be very heavy so you will need some help so you don't hurt yourself.

Its probably not worth going and renting a jackhammer to break up such a small piece. Slate is brittle and will break apart pretty easy with a sledge (Watch your toes however) The problem is if you go at it with a sledge you probably won't have many usable pieces left so your best bet is to dismantle. As for using it outside you need to be careful as this slate will be smooth and therefore slippery when wet. I know they use a torch on granite to roughen it up but I'm not sure if you could do the same with slate. Hope this helps you out.

Mike

A. Spruce
Re: How do I remove old HEAVY billiard table?
sabo4545 wrote:

Its probably not worth going and renting a jackhammer to break up such a small piece. Slate is brittle and will break apart pretty easy with a sledge (Watch your toes however) The problem is if you go at it with a sledge you probably won't have many usable pieces left so your best bet is to dismantle.

Mike

Agreed, the thing with the slate, as already said, it's very brittle and will break easily, but you can control that breakage to a degree. If you've ever broken up concrete you know that it's hard or nearly impossible to do by hand UNLESS you raise a corner. This not only puts stress on it, it removes half its rigidity and gives it a place to flex and break. Similarly with the slate, undo the bolts and lift one edge then smack it with a hammer - any hammer will do. You'll not only get it into smaller pieces, you should also be able to control the size and shape, to a degree, by how you support and strike it. If you want perfectly square pieces, drill a series of holes along a line and strike the line with the hammer.

Don't forget to wear personal safety gear.

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