Home>Discussions>KITCHENS>How can I solve this countertop challenge?
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erikhaan
How can I solve this countertop challenge?

The previous owner of my home used a contractor who, from my opinion, improperly installed our kitchen countertop, leaving us with a situation where when water collects behind the sink it is dripping below the sink (and actually behind the cabinet). You'll see, from the pictures below, it appears the laminate was improperly measured and the contractor's solution was to glue an additional strip of laminate. The strips are now coming apart.

We're planning to buy a new countertop at some point, but we'd love suggestions on how we could stop-gap the problem, for the time-being.

To be clear: The faucet is not leaking. The water collects behind the sink because water, from dishwashing, splashes back there.

Here are the pics:

HoustonRemodeler
Re: How can I solve this countertop challenge?

As a stop gap measure; clean it very very well, let it dry, then smear a nice thick coating of silicone in the area. Using a dampened finger or teaspoon you can smooth the top into a gentle curved or flat shape to shed the water back into the sink or to the sides.

Then place a jar on the window sill and every time you clench your teeth thinking of what a dope the countertop guy was, put a dollar in the jar for the new counter. ;)

MLB Construction
Re: How can I solve this countertop challenge?

houston is right, it's an ugly fix but one that will prevent any further problems. allow me to repeat the most important thing he said. make sure it is 100% dry before you apply the silicon or it won't take.

dj1
Re: How can I solve this countertop challenge?

With so many places for water to penetrate, I bet the counter top is soggy and soft by now.

keith3267
Re: How can I solve this countertop challenge?

I would not use silicone caulk. Since you want this to be sort of temporary and I assume reasonably good looking, then I would use quarter round trim tile and that special caulk used for seams in showers, not grout, its a sanded acrylic caulk. for temporary use, just make a good bed of this caulk and embed the quarter round trim tiles in it. When the caulk settles. fill in the gaps with more caulk like a grout. With this caulk, it can be removed later.

I don't think the fault was with the countertop installer. I suspect that the bottom row of tiles was supposed to be the type used around teh base of showers, they have a concave quarter round at the bottom.

Gizmo
Re: How can I solve this countertop challenge?
keith3267 wrote:

I don't think the fault was with the countertop installer. I suspect that the bottom row of tiles was supposed to be the type used around teh base of showers, they have a concave quarter round at the bottom.

Hmmmm :rolleyes:

Thats a hack job.

Its possible the top had a back splash on it and got removed forcing the installer to fill the space.

Go to one of the Big Box store and buy a pc of vinyl door stop or base baoard. Cut it to lenght and width then set it in caulk. Caulk the vinyl to the tile and sink until your ready to replace the top.

erikhaan
Re: How can I solve this countertop challenge?

Thanks for the suggestions, everyone. I'm going to think about the best solution and will show you what I came up with.

Best,
Erik

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