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Johnback
Help! Windows before Roofing??
Johnback

Am homeowner with a pretty big remodeling/addition ongoing as I write this. GC Has provided schedule of events and shows window and door instalation coming before roofing. Seems out of sync to me. Need recommendations at your earliest convenience.

I Was unable to figure out how to attach a copy of the sequence note in question.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??
Sombreuil_mongrel

As long as the roof is tarpapered (or the equivalent) it's safe to set windows, as long as the roof finish is applied in a timely fashion.
Casey

dj1
Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??
dj1

Your GC's sequence is not out of the ordinary, as long as the roof is covered. Many times these two are done roughly at the same time.

The secret to a successful construction is to line up the subs and the inspector on schedule, to avoid delays and to protect what's already in the building, from the elements and from thieves (yes, thieves).

Mastercarpentry
Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??
Mastercarpentry

On the Super-McMansions I used to work on, the roofing was the last major thing done, but they used "Titanium" roof underlayment instead of tarpaper. Never a leak with that, even in severe thunderstorms. I had to see it myself before I was convinced. That builder was one of the smartest and most experienced I've ever worked with and to him, money was secondary to a top-flight job so if there was a better way he would have taken it without hesitation.

So yes, as long as the water stays out it is OK. If any windows get water-damaged have the contractor replace them before proceeding.

Phil

Johnback
Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??
Johnback
dj1 wrote:

Your GC's sequence is not out of the ordinary, as long as the roof is covered. Many times these two are done roughly at the same time.

The secret to a successful construction is to line up the subs and the inspector on schedule, to avoid delays and to protect what's already in the building, from the elements and from thieves (yes, thieves).

Thanks. When you say "covered" are you talking sheathed, or sheathed and tar papered?

Johnback
Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??
Johnback

Thanks to all responders ! Part two of question developed...should house be wrapped first? GC did not mention when Tyvek was going on so am not sure it is ahead of or behind windows.....

A. Spruce
Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??
A. Spruce

house wrap, then windows is always how I've seen it done/done it.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??
HoustonRemodeler

Round these parts once the roof shingles are on, the house is considered to be at 65% finished valuation for tax purposes. Holding back on the shingles until after the New Year is common here to reduce the tax burden.

dj1
Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??
dj1
Johnback wrote:

Thanks. When you say "covered" are you talking sheathed, or sheathed and tar papered?

"Covered" is with tar paper.

Windows or house wrap - which one first? can be done either way. Then again, I live in a place that has little rain.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??
Mastercarpentry

Housewrap first always, it turns into the window and door openings. Window sills get soft flashing turned up at the sides by at least 3". Windows with brick molding go over that into a bead of caulking to seal the backside, then are edge-caulked to the housewrap. Flange-mount windows go atop the housewrap into a bead of caulking and are sealed on top of the flange with soft flashing. There's a special technique for that; the housewrap goes over the soft flashing on top with corners sealed with more soft flashing, but the housewrap everywhere else is under the soft flashing and the flashing laps are arranged to shed water (bottom then sides then top in that order).

Darn few contractors and subs take the time to do this right. Check the window and door manufacturer's recommended installation procedures. This is the most important stuff on your house that you can't easily access after it's finished so you only get one chance to do it right- after that rectifying problems is a nightmare. If it's not done correctly you will find it needing to be rectified later on. If your contractor does it right they will appreciate you taking time to learn how it's supposed to be done, but if they gripe about you making them do it the right way you should be looking very closely at everything else they did. Good contractors are craftsmen and will want to do it right. Bad contractors outnumber the good by at least 5 to one. These are small details but very important ones and how they are dealt with will be a very good gauge of which kind of contractor you have.

Phil

Re: Help! Windows before Roofing??

inefficient windows and siding won't typically cause any immediate damage to the home.

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