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docspencer
Help with coax to TVs

We are having a TV antenna installed at the end of the month in our new house. Like an idiot, I didn't have the house pre-wired for this. The installer will take the coax from the antenna and run it to a central point in the basement.

For various reasons I pretty much HAVE to run the coax from the TVs through the basement/crawlspace. I have a rough idea where my reference points are down there, but I'd love to know if - for example - there are tricks that will allow me to drill DOWN into the wall plates to the basement rather than try and figure exactly where I need to drill UP. I hope this makes sense.

I'd appreciate any helpful hints.

libcarp
Re: Help with coax to TVs

On the wall where you want the coax cable, remove the baseboard moulding and drill a small 1/8" hole down through the subfloor right up against the wall. Then stick a wire coat hanger in the hole - go into the basement and determine which side of the wall the wire hanger is on and drill your hole 2-1/4" away from the wire hanger into the center of the wall cavity. Be sure to use RG-6 cable for the install and try to minimize the number of splitters required.

David
Re: Help with coax to TVs

The easiest way to go down through a wall into a basement/crawlspace is to use a 5/8" flexible bit.

This Old House Tip on youtube "Bad Larry"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTGe8_SyKgY

Before you make any cuts, have an idea of where you going to make sure nothing is in the way. (ducting, wires, plumbing, etc)

Blue RidgeParkway
Re: Help with coax to TVs

coax loses a lot of the signal in a short distance. you should consider using flat 300 ohm ribbon that you twist it loses much less antena signal to your basement from the antena. otherwise you're going to need signal amplifiers and more equipment. don't forget your new tuner boxes that you get with the government cupons if you have old tv tuners the new tuners are going to be needed next february.

docspencer
Re: Help with coax to TVs

these are both great ideas. As it turns out, each is suited for just one of the situations. The bad larry is perfect for tv in the greatroom, the other solution for the tv in the bedroom.

where can I find a bad larry?

kentvw
Re: Help with coax to TVs

LOL, Go to Home Depot and ask for a "Bad Larry"........

My area HD stocks these.

http://www.idealindustries.com/products/tools_totes/saws_drill_bits/flexible_drill_bits.jsp

David
Re: Help with coax to TVs
libcarp wrote:

Be sure to use RG-6 cable for the install and try to minimize the number of splitters required.

RG-6 Quadshield isn't a bad idea either especially from the antenna to the splitter. Try to keep away from power and if you have to cross, do so at a right angle.

For the money I would buy at least 4'x 1/2" flexbit, in case you ever have to go through a cross support in the middle of the wall. IDEAL and Greenlee both make good flexbits. Extensions are available in the event that its too short.

Re: Help with coax to TVs

Two trick I used is find where you want to cut into the sheet rock or plaster for your box. I then drive a finish nail close to the wall in center where the box is. Go down to the basement or area below the box. Measure back from the exposed nail half the thickness of the wall. I then drill up with a small bit to make sure I hit the spot. I have also done the same thing with a piece of a coat hanger in my drill motor. it makes a small hole. Just becareful if it is used through carpet. Although the coat hanger typically will not grab and unravel the carpet.

Ernie_Fergler
Re: Help with coax to TVs
Ravens53 wrote:

Two trick I used is find where you want to cut into the sheet rock or plaster for your box. I then drive a finish nail close to the wall in center where the box is. Go down to the basement or area below the box. Measure back from the exposed nail half the thickness of the wall. I then drill up with a small bit to make sure I hit the spot. I have also done the same thing with a piece of a coat hanger in my drill motor. it makes a small hole. Just becareful if it is used through carpet. Although the coat hanger typically will not grab and unravel the carpet.

Great advice.
Have you ever tried to use a paddle bit on carpeting?:eek:
You only ever do that one once....

canuk
Re: Help with coax to TVs
Blue RidgeParkway wrote:

coax loses a lot of the signal in a short distance. you should consider using flat 300 ohm ribbon that you twist it loses much less antena signal to your basement from the antena. otherwise you're going to need signal amplifiers and more equipment. don't forget your new tuner boxes that you get with the government cupons if you have old tv tuners the new tuners are going to be needed next february.

I would have to disagree
Shielded cable is a better choice than a flat 300 ohm pair.
The 300 ohm pair is susceptible to all kinds of interference from external components like the metal mast or other metal components. Also problems with running it properly to avoid turning it into it's second antenna.

The 75 ohm coax being shield cable has better resistance to interference.

There are antennas that have 75 ohm outputs and those that have 300 ohm output would be converted to 75 ohm with a balun for the transmission line run.

Ernie_Fergler
Re: Help with coax to TVs
canuk wrote:

I would have to disagree
Shielded cable is a better choice than a flat 300 ohm pair.
The 300 ohm pair is susceptible to all kinds of interference from external components like the metal mast or other metal components. Also problems with running it properly to avoid turning it into it's second antenna.

The 75 ohm coax being shield cable has better resistance to interference.

There are antennas that have 75 ohm outputs and those that have 300 ohm output would be converted to 75 ohm with a balun for the transmission line run.

I agree with going with the 300 ohm {coaxe}.
75 ohm ribbon cable came over on the Mayflower.

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